Virgil, Eclogues

LCL 63: 28-29

Go To Section
Go To Section
Tools

Virgil

hic illum vidi iuvenem, Meliboee, quotannis bis senos cui nostra dies altaria fumant. hic mihi responsum primus dedit ille petenti: 45“pascite, ut ante, boves, pueri; submittite tauros.”

meliboeus

Fortunate senex, ergo tua rura manebunt, et tibi magna satis, quamvis lapis omnia nudus limosoque palus obducat pascua iunco. non insueta gravis temptabunt pabula fetas, 50nec mala vicini pecoris contagia laedent. fortunate senex, hic inter flumina nota et fontis sacros frigus captabis opacum. hinc tibi, quae semper, vicino ab limite saepes Hyblaeis apibus florem depasta salicti 55saepe levi somnum suadebit inire susurro; hinc alta sub rupe canet frondator ad auras: nec tamen interea raucae, tua cura, palumbes, nec gemere aëria cessabit turtur ab ulmo.

tityrus

Ante leves ergo pascentur in aethere cervi, 60et freta destituent nudos in litore pisces, ante pererratis amborum finibus exsul aut Ararim Parthus bibet aut Germania Tigrim, quam nostro illius labatur pectore vultus.

meliboeus

At nos hinc alii sitientis ibimus Afros, 65pars Scythiam et rapidum cretae veniemus Oaxen et penitus toto divisos orbe Britannos. en umquam patrios longo post tempore finis, pauperis et tuguri congestum caespite culmen

28

Eclogues

that youth for whom our altars smoke twice six days a year.1 Here he was the first to give my plea an answer: “Feed, swains, your oxen as of old; rear your bulls.”

meliboeus

Happy old man! So these lands will still be yours, and large enough for you, though bare stones cover all, and the marsh chokes your pastures with slimy rushes. Still, no strange herbage shall try your breeding ewes, no baneful infection from a neighbour’s flock shall harm them. Happy old man! Here, amid familiar streams and sacred springs, you shall enjoy the cooling shade. On this side, as of old, on your neighbour’s border, the hedge whose willow blossoms are sipped by Hybla’s bees shall often with its gentle hum soothe you to slumber; on that, under the towering rock, the woodman’s song shall fill the air; while still the cooing wood pigeons, your pets, and the turtle dove shall cease not their moaning from the elm tops.

tityrus

Sooner, then, shall the nimble stag graze in air, and the seas leave their fish bare on the strand—sooner, each wandering over the other’s frontiers, shall the Parthian in exile drink the Arar, and Germany the Tigris, than that look of his shall fade from my heart.

meliboeus

But we must go hence—some to the thirsty Africans, some to reach Scythia and the chalk-rolling Oaxes, and the Britons, wholly sundered from all the world. Ah, shall I ever, long years hence, look again on my country’s bounds, on my humble cottage with its turf-clad roof—shall I, long

  • 1Evidently a monthly ritual.
29
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.virgil-eclogues.1916