Theocritus, Idylls

LCL 28: 118-119

Tools

THEOCRITUS

ζωστῆρι πλακερῷ, ῥοικὰν δ’ ἔχεν ἀγριελαίω δεξιτερᾷ κορύναν. καί μ’ ἀτρέμας εἶπε σεσαρώς 20ὄμματι μειδιόωντι, γέλως δέ οἱ εἴχετο χείλευς· “Σιμιχίδα, πᾷ δὴ τὺ μεσαμέριον πόδας ἕλκεις, ἁνίκα δὴ καὶ σαῦρος ἐν αἱμασιαῖσι καθεύδει, οὐδ’ ἐπιτυμβίδιοι κορυδαλλίδες ἠλαίνοντι; ἦ μετὰ δαῖτ’ ἄκλητος ἐπείγεαι, ἤ τινος ἀστῶν 25λανὸν ἔπι θρῴσκεις; ὥς τοι ποσὶ νισσομένοιο πᾶσα λίθος πταίοισα ποτ’ ἀρβυλίδεσσιν ἀείδει.” τὸν δ’ ἐγὼ ἀμείφθην· “Λυκίδα φίλε, φαντί τυ πάντες ἦμεν συρικτὰν μέγ’ ὑπείροχον ἔν τε νομεῦσιν ἔν τ’ ἀματήρεσσι. τὸ δὴ μάλα θυμὸν ἰαίνει 30ἁμέτερον· καίτοι κατ’ ἐμὸν νόον ἰσοφαρίζειν ἔλπομαι. ἁ δ’ ὁδὸς ἅδε θαλυσιάς· ἦ γὰρ ἑταῖροι ἀνέρες εὐπέπλῳ Δαμάτερι δαῖτα τελεῦντι ὄλβω ἀπαρχόμενοι· μάλα γάρ σφισι πίονι μέτρῳ ἁ δαίμων εὔκριθον ἀνεπλήρωσεν ἀλωάν. 35ἀλλ’ ἄγε δή, ξυνὰ γὰρ ὁδὸς ξυνὰ δὲ καὶ ἀώς, βουκολιασδώμεσθα· τάχ’ ὥτερος ἄλλον ὀνασεῖ. καὶ γὰρ ἐγὼ Μοισᾶν καπυρὸν στόμα, κἠμὲ λέγοντι πάντες ἀοιδὸν ἄριστον· ἐγὼ δέ τις οὐ ταχυπειθής, οὐ Δᾶν· οὐ γάρ πω κατ’ ἐμὸν νόον οὔτε τὸν ἐσθλόν 40Σικελίδαν νίκημι τὸν ἐκ Σάμω οὔτε Φιλίταν

  • 28 ἦμεν Wilamowitz: ἔμμεν(αι) M
  • 40 Φιλίταν Croenert: -ήταν M
118

IDYLL 7

belt, and in his right hand he held a crooked club of wild olive. With a twinkle in his eye he grinned complacently, and laughter hung about his lips as he said to me, “Simichidas, where are you going on foot in the middle of the day, when even the lizard sleeps in the walls and the tomb-crested5 larks are not about? Are you hurrying to gate-crash a dinner, or rushing off to some citizen’s store of wine? As your feet go along all the pebbles are ringing as they strike against your boots.”

“Lycidas my friend,” I replied, “everyone among the herdsmen and reapers says that you are far and away the most eminent piper, and it gladdens my heart to hear it; and yet in my own opinion I think I can rival you. It’s to a harvest festival that we are traveling. Some friends of mine are arranging a feast for fair-robed Demeter as an offering of firstfruits from their copious stores; the goddess has filled their threshing floors with good grain in rich measure. But come, since we are traveling the same road at the same time, let’s perform bucolic songs, and maybe each of us will benefit the other. I myself am a clear voice of the Muses, and everyone says I’m an excellent singer—not that I’m quick to believe them, by Zeus; in my own opinion I’m not yet a match in song for the great Sicelidas from Samos, or for Philitas,6 but compete with them like

119
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.theocritus-idylls.2015