Statius, Silvae

LCL 206: 58-59

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SILVAE

nec promissa semel. Libyci quid mira tributi obsequia et missum media de pace triumphum 85laudem et opes quantas nec qui mandaverat ausus exspectare fuit, [gaudet Trasimennus et Alpes] 86aattollam cantu? gaudet Trasimennus et Alpes Cannensesque animae; primusque insigne tributum ipse palam laeta noscebat Regulus umbra. non vacat Arctoas acies Rhenumque rebellem 90captivaeque preces Veledae et, quae maxima nuper gloria, depositam Dacis pereuntibus Urbem pandere, cum tanti lectus rectoris habenas, Gallice, Fortuna non admirante subisti. “Hunc igitur, si digna loquor, rapiemus iniquo, 95nate, Iovi. rogat hoc Latiae pater inclitus urbis et meruit; neque enim frustra mihi nuper honora carmina patricio, pueri, sonuistis in ostro. si qua salutifero gemini Chironis in antro herba, tholo quodcumque tibi Troiana recondit 100Pergamos aut medicis felix Epidaurus harenis educat, Idaea profert quam Creta sub umbra dictamni florentis opem, quoque anguis abundat spumatu—iungam ipse manus atque omne benignum

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BOOK I

than once, call him home. Why praise the wondrous compliance of Libya’s tribute, triumph sent to Rome from the midst of peace, and exalt in song such wealth as not even he that commissioned you19 had dared expect? * * * Trasimene and the Alps and the ghosts of Cannae rejoice, and first of all Regulus himself appeared, his happy shade taking note of the splendid tribute. Time lacks to set forth the armies of the north and rebel Rhine, the prayers of Veleda, and, greatest and latest glory, Rome placed in your charge as the Dacians were perishing, when you, Gallicus, were chosen to take the reins from so great a ruler,20 to Fortune no surprise.

“Him then, my son, if my words be meet, shall we snatch from the adverse Jove.21 The renowned father of the Latian city demands it, and he has deserved it; for not for nothing, you boys, did you lately sound your song in my honor, clad in patrician purple.22 If there be any herb in two-formed Chiron’s health-giving cave, whatever Trojan Pergamus stores for you in your temple or fortunate Epidaurus raises in her healing sands, the virtue of flowering dittany that Crete brings forth under Ida’s foliage, the foam in which your snake abounds—I myself shall join my hands, and every salutary juice that shepherd was taught

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.statius-silvae.2015