Sophocles, Fragment (Oeneus?)

LCL 483: 418-419

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Sophocles

Doubtful Fragment

ΟΙΝΕΥΣ ?

Ed. pr. of P.Oxy. 1083 Hunt, P.Oxy. viii (1911), 60 f, with Plate iii. See Page, GLP no. 31; Maas, BPW 32 (1912) 1426 f = Kleine Schriften 50 f; Wilamowitz, NJKA 29 (1912) 449 =Kl. Schr. 347; Pfeiffer, WS 79 (1966) 65 f; Carden, 135 f (with bibliography); Radt, 636 f. See on Μάντεις (The Prophets).

The publication in 1962 of new fragments of this papyrus as P.Oxy. 2453 showed that not all of its contents came from the same play; see on the Μάντεις and the Ἀνδρομέδα. The presence of a rare word quoted as from the latter play (see fr. 133) has strengthened the case for thinking that fr. 1130 is by Sophocles. There is a gap before the name of Oeneus opposite line 19, and Σχ]οινεύς (Schoeneus) has been suggested. Both he and Oeneus had daughters who were the objects of competition; but

1130
<ΧΟΡΟΣ>

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . κυρεῖν δρῶντα δηλοῦν τί· χρη[ ἐργάτην τοιοῦδ᾿ ἀγῶνος αἰχμαλ[ωτ

418

Doubtful Fragment

Doubtful Fragment

Oeneus?

Schoeneus’ daughter Atalanta used to challenge her suitors to race her, which does not fit the situation described in this fragment. Does Oeneus fit it any better? It has been objected that his daughter Deianeira was fought over by Heracles and Achelous (see The Women of Trachis), but was not the prize in an open competition. However, supposing Oeneus was simply trying to find someone to fight Achelous for his daughter, the satyrs might well have volunteered. Apart from this fragment, “the evidence for this title is meagre and inconclusive,” as Pearson (I p. 121) put it. But though Radt has placed it among the “Dubia et Spuria,” it seems to me highly probable that this fragment is from an Oeneus by Sophocles.

1130
<chorus οf satyrs>

. . . to explain what . . . was doing. He who is the cause of such a struggle should (be made a) prisoner!

419
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.sophocles-doubtful_fragment_oeneus.1996