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ΠΑΝΥΑΣΙΣ

118[2 a.d.]ΗΡΑΚΛΗΙΣ

Ed. pr. *Grenfell-Hunt, P. Oxy.ii. 1899, no. 221, col. ix. πῶς δ᾿ ἐπορεύθης ῥεῦμ᾿ Ἀχελωίου ἀργυροδίνα, Ὠκεανοῦ ποταμοῖο δι᾿ εὐρέος ὑγρὰ κέλευθα;

. . . . . .

Anonymous

119[2–1 b.c.]Fragment

Ed. pr. Aly, Sitzungsberichte der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, v. 1914, Abh. 2, p. 1. See *Powell, Collectanea Alexandrina, 251; Maas, Gnomon, 1927, 692.

Fragment of an hexameter poem of uncertain date and subject. The Epic Cycle is probably excluded by reason of

ὡς δ᾿ ἁλιεὺς ἀκτῆι ἐν ἁλιρράντωι ἐπὶ πέτρηι ἀγ(κ)ίστρου ἕλικος δελεουχίδα μάστακ᾿ ἀείρας

. . . . . .

(Fragments of two more lines)

  • 2δ᾿ ἕλικος Π. τελιουχίδα Π, corr. Powell.
484

Erinna

Panyasis

Heracles [2 a.d.]

8–11, p. 64. See Wilamowitz, G.G.A. 1900, 42; *Powell, Collect. Alexandr. p. 248.

How did you come to the stream of Achelous’s silver eddies, through the watery ways of the broad river Ocean?

. . . . .

Anonymous

Fragment [2–1 b.c.]

such a word as δελεουχίδα (or τελιουχίδα): the relation to Homer is closer than would be expected in an Hellenistic poem. Antimachus and his 4th-century posterity are possible authors: but the evidence is too meagre to permit a definite conclusion.

Like a fisherman on a rock on the sea-washed shore, lifting the enticing bait of his curved hook . . .

. . . . .

(Fragments of two more lines)

485
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.select_papyri_poetry_elegiac_hexameter_poems.1941