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SALLUST

<EPISTULAE> AD CAESAREM SENEM DE RE PUBLICA

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1. Pro vero antea optinebat regna atque imperia fortunam dono dare, item alia quae per mortaleis avide cupiuntur, quia et apud indignos saepe erant quasi per libidinem data neque quoiquam incorrupta permanserant. 2Sed res docuit id verum esse, quod in carminibus Appius ait, fabrum esse suae quemque fortunae, atque in te maxume, qui tantum alios praegressus es, ut prius defessi sint homines laudando facta tua quam tu laude digna faciundo. 3Ceterum

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FIRST LETTER TO CAESAR

<LETTERS> TO THE ELDER CAESAR CONCERNING THE AFFAIRS OF STATE1

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[ca. Oct. 48 BC]2

1. Previously, it used to be taken for granted that Fortune makes a gift of kingdoms and empires, as well as other objects eagerly coveted among mortals, because those possessions were often in the hands of the undeserving, as if given capriciously, and they had not remained intact under anyone’s control. But experience has demonstrated that what Appius3 stated in his verses is true, that “every man is the fashioner of his own fortune,” and especially so with regard to you, who have excelled others so much so that men have sooner become weary in praising your deeds than you have in doing deeds worthy of praise. But

479
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.sallust-letters_caesar_1.2015