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SALLUST

FRAGMENTA DUBIA ET SPURIA

1* deest in M, Mc, D, K, nuovo 2 Funari

aquis hiemantibus

Sen. Ep. 114.19: inspired by this expression in S., the historian L. Arruntius overused hiemare metaphorically in various contexts.

2* dub. 2M, deest in Mc, inc. 111D, inc. 78K

†volgus†1 amat fieri2

Quint. 9.3.17: to illustrate a Graecism in S.—presumably amo + inf. in the sense of Gk. φιλεῖ = “to be accustomed,” a usage first attested in S. (TLL 1.1956.35–59)—but the text may be corrupt. Recent editors of Quintilian delete volgus to produce the equivalent of φιλεῖ γίγνεσθαι = “tends to happen” (cf. Thuc. 3.81.5).

3* 1.18M (testimonia), 1.16Mc (comm.), 1.33D (testim.), 1.38K (testim.)

omne ius in validioribus esse

Fronto p. 157.14–15: to illustrate a distinctive Sallustian turn of phrase.

442

DOUBTFUL AND SPURIOUS FRAGMENTS

DOUBTFUL AND SPURIOUS FRAGMENTS

1* not included in M, Mc, D, K, nuovo 2 Funari

This may be a misquotation of Jug. 37.4 (hiemalibus aquis), but Seneca quotes to illustrate the verb hiemare, not the adj.

amid the wintry waters

2* dub. 2M, not included in Mc, inc. 111D, inc. 78K

Dietsch speculated that Quintilian misquoted Jug. 34.1 (quae ira fieri amat) and that volgus came to be added under the influence of the context in Jug. 34.1, which describes an angry multitudo at a public meeting.

* * *1 tends to happen

3* 1.18M (testimonia), 1.16Mc (comm.), 1.33D (testim.), 1.38K (testim.)

Possibly a paraphrase, or loose quotation of omne ius in viribus esset (fr. 1.16).

that all right is in the possession of stronger men

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.sallust-histories_doubtful_fragments.2015