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Plutarch’s Moralia

(1057)ΣΥΝΟΙΣ ΤΟΥ1 ΟΤΙ ΠΑΡΑΔΟΞΟΤΕΡΑ ΟΙ ΣΤΩΙΚΟΙ ΤΩΝ ΠΟΙΗΤΩΝ2 ΛΕΓΟΥΣΙΝ3

1. Ὁ4 Πινδάρου Καινεὺς εὔθυναν5 ὑπεῖχεν, ἀπιθάνως Dἄρρηκτος σιδήρῳ καὶ ἀπαθὴς τὸ σῶμα πλαττόμενος εἶτα καταδὺς ἄτρωτος ὑπὸ γῆν “σχίσας ὀρθῷ ποδὶ γᾶν” ὁ δὲ Στωικὸς Λαπίθης, ὥσπερ ἐξ ἀδαμαντίνης ὕλης ὑπ᾿ αὐτῶν τῆς ἀπαθείας κεχαλκευμένος, οὐκ ἄτρωτός ἐστιν οὐδ᾿ ἄνοσος οὐδ᾿ ἀναλγὴς6 ἄφοβος δὲ μένει καὶ ἄλυπος καὶ ἀήττητος καὶ ἀβίαστος, τιτρωσκόμενος ἀλγῶν στρεβλούμενος ἐν κατασκαφαῖς πατρίδος ἐν πάθεσι οἰκείοις.7

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The Stoics And The Poets,

Conspectus of the Essay, “the Stoics Talk More Paradoxically Than the Poets”

1. The Caeneus of Pindar used to be taken to task for being an implausible fiction with his invulnerability to iron and his physical insensitivity and his having at last sunk down underground unwounded “as erect on his feet he split the earth asunder”a; but the Lapith of the Stoics, whom they have made out of insensitivityb as if they had forged him of steel, is not immune from wounds or disease or pain but remains fearless and undistressed and invincible and unconstrained while wounded, in pain, on the rack, in the midst of his country’s destruction, in the midst of his own private calamities. And, while the

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.plutarch-moralia_stoics_talk_more_paradoxically_than_poets.1976