Tools

Pindar

ἐμ̣ο̣ὶ̣ δ̣ὲ τοῦτο̣[ν δ]ι̣έδω- κ. ν] ἀθάνατ̣[ο]ν πόνον (restant frustula vv. 23–40) [ . . . . . . . ]a[ .]υνας· τί πείσομα[ι ᾖ Διὸς οὐκ ἐθέλο[ισα Κοίου θυγάτηρ π[ 45ἄπιστά μ[ο]ι δέδο[ι]κ̣α̣ κ̣α̣μ̣[ δέ μιν ἐν πέλ̣[α]γ̣[ο]ς̣ ῥιφθεῖσαν εὐαγέα πέτραν φανῆναι[· καλέ̣οντί μιν Ὀρτυγίαν ναῦται πάλαι. πεφόρητο δ᾿ ἐπ᾿ Αἰγαῖον θαμά, 50τᾶς ὁ κράτιστος ἐράσσατο μιχθείς τοξοφόρον τελέσαι γόνον (desunt vv. 53–57 )

Pae. 8

52i ΔΕΛ]Φ̣ΟΙΣ [ΕΙΣ ΠΥΘΩ

P. Oxy. 841 (4, 1908), vv. 1–3, 66–70, 72–75, 79–99; P. Oxy. 1791 (15, 1922), vv. 63–81; P. Oxy. 2442 (26, 1961), vv. 67–

  • 46suppl. Wilamowitz
  • 50τᾶς = τέως V. Schmidt: ἇς = ἕως Grenfell–Hunt
282

Paeans

But to me (they) have handed overAnt. this immortal task (lines 23–40 are missing or fragmentary)

. . . . . .Ep. “ . . . What shall I suffer?” So spoke the daughter49 of Coeus, unwilling50 . . . of Zeus 45Things unbelievable to me I fear . . . but (they say that) having been thrown into the sea, she appeared as a conspicuous rock. Sailors have called her Ortygia51 since olden times. And she was often borne over the Aegean, 50until the most powerful one desired to lie with her52 and produce bow-bearing offspring . . .

Paean 8 52i FOR THE DELPHIANS TO PYTHO

Various papyri

This fragment tells of the second and third temples of Apollo built at Delphi. According to Pausanias (10.5.9) the first temple was constructed of laurel branches brought from Tempe. The second temple, built by bees of beeswax

283
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.pindar-fragments.1997