Menander Rhetor, Treatise 2

LCL 539: 290-291

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MENANDER RHETOR

2.11. ΠΕΡΙ ΣΤΕΦΑΝΩΤΙΚΟΥ

1. Ἐν τῷ στεφανωτικῷ προοιμιάσῃ εὐθὺς ἀπὸ τοῦ στεφάνου καὶ τῆς δόξης τοῦ βασιλέως, καὶ ὅτι φθάνει μὲν τὸ κρεῖττον αὐτῇ τῇ βασιλείᾳ στεφάνῳ τιμῶν, καὶ ἡ σύμπασα οἰκουμένη τῷ μεγίστῳ στεφανοῦσα στεφάνῳ, ταῖς εὐφημίαις· ἥκει δὲ παρά σε καὶ ἡ πόλις ἡ ἡμετέρα, οὐδεμιᾶς τῶν σῶν ὑπηκόων οὔτε δόξαις οὔτε μεγέθεσιν οὔτε κάλλεσιν ἡττωμένη, λόγοις τε ἅμα στεφανοῦσα καὶ χρυσῷ τῷ στέμματι.

2. Ἐὰν μὲν σχῇ γένος εὐδόκιμον, μετὰ τὸ προοίμιον ποιήσῃ τοῦ βασιλέως τὸ ἐγκώμιον ἀπὸ τοῦ γένους· εἰ δὲ μή γε, εὐθὺς ἀπὸ τῆς τύχης ἀντὶ τοῦ γένους, ὅτι θεὸς κατοικτείρας ἄνωθεν τὸ ἀνθρώπινον γένος καὶ βουληθεὶς ταῖς εὐδαιμονίαις παραμυθήσασθαι τὴν σὴν παρήγαγε γένεσιν ἐπ’ ἀγαθῇ μοίρᾳ τῆς οἰκουμένης.

3. Εἶτα ἐρεῖς ἐὰν ἔχῃς παιδείαν καὶ ἀνατροφὴν ἔνδοξον. εἶτα ἐφάψῃ τῶν ἀρετῶν ἐπὶ τούτοις, τῆς ἀνδρείας πρώτης· ὅτι <καὶ>1 γάρ τοι διατελεῖς ἐν δουρὶ καὶ ἵππῳ καὶ ἀσπίδι ἄθλους μεγίστους ἀγωνιζόμενος ὑπὲρ τῆς ὑφ’ ἥλιον, καθάπερ Ἡρακλέα φασὶ τὸν Διός· ἐν ᾧ μνημονεύσεις ὅτι βαρβάρων οἱ μὲν τελέως

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2.11. THE CROWN SPEECH

2.11. THE CROWN SPEECH

1. In the crown speech (stephanōtikos logos), lead off your introduction with the crown and the emperor’s glory. “Heaven was the first to honor you with the crown of the empire itself, and the whole world1 crowns you with the greatest crown of all, words of praise. Our city too comes before you, one not inferior to any other city under your rule with respect to glory, size, or beauty, and she crowns you with words and with this wreath of gold.”

2. Following the introduction, you should fashion an encomium of the emperor on the basis of his distinguished family, if indeed he has one. But if not, immediately take up the topic of good fortune instead. “Because a god on high took pity on the human race and wished to console it with prosperity, he brought about your birth for the good fortune of the world.”

3. Next, speak of his glorious education and upbringing, if you can do so. After that, touch on his virtues, beginning with courage. “For you constantly engage in the mightiest battles with spear, horse, and shield on behalf of all the world under the sun, as they say Zeus’ son Heracles did.” Here you can mention, “Some barbarians have been

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.menander_rhetor-treatise_2.2019