Historia Augusta, 30. Carus, Carinus, Numerian

LCL 263: 416-417

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Carus, Carinus and Numerian

Carus Et Carinus Et Numerianus

Flavii Vopisci Syracusii

I. Fato rem publicam regi eamque nunc ad summum evehi, nunc ad minima retrahi Probi mors satis 2prodidit. nam cum ducta per tempora variis vel erecta motibus vel adflicta, nunc tempestate aliqua nunc felicitate variata omnia prope passa esset quae patitur in homine uno mortalitas, videbatur post diversitatem malorum iam secura continuata felicitate mansura post Aurelianum vehementem principem Probo ex sententia senatus ac populi1 leges et gubernacula 3temperante. sed ruina ingens vel naufragii modo vel incendii accensis fataliter militibus sublato e medio tali principe in eam desperationem votum publicum redegit ut timerent omnes Domitianos, Vitellios et

416

Carus, Carinus and Numerian

Carus, Carinus and Numerian

by Flavius Vopiscus of Syracuse

I. That it is Fate which governs the commonwealth, now exalting it to the heights and again thrusting it down to the depths, was made very clear by the death of Probus. For the state, in its course through the ages, was by turns raised up and dashed down by divers commotions, and, in the changes wrought now by some tempest and again by a time of prosperity, it suffered well nigh all the ills that human life may suffer in the case of a single man; but at last, after a diversity of evils, it seemed about to abide in assured and unbroken felicity, when, after the reign of Aurelian, a vigorous prince, both the laws and the helm of the state were directed by Probus in accordance with the wish of the senate and people.1 Nevertheless, a mighty disaster, coming like a shipwreck or a conflagration, when the soldiers had been fired with a fated madness and this great prince had been removed from our midst, reduced the hopes of the state to such despair that all feared a Domitian,

417
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.historia_augusta_carus_carinus_numerian.1932