Tools

FRL V: ORATORY, PART 3

136 C. PORCIUS CATO

C. Porcius Cato (tr. pl. 56 BC; RE Porcius 6) is described by Fenestella as an unruly and audacious young man, but a ready speaker (T 1).

In 54 BC Cato was prosecuted by C. Asinius Pollio (174

T 1 Fenestella 22, FRHist 70 F 2 (ap. Non., p.385.6–12 M. = 615 L.)

= F 4.

As a Young Man on Cn. Pompeius Magnus (F2)

At his earliest recorded public appearance, in 59 BC, Cato called Cn. Pompeius Magnus (111) a “private dictator” when Cato attempted to charge A. Gabinius (cos. 58 BC)

F 2 Cic. Q Fr. 1.2.15

rem publicam funditus amisimus, adeo ut <C.>1 Cato, adulescens nullius consilii, sed tamen civis Romanus et Cato, vix vivus effugerit2 quod, cum Gabinium de ambitu vellet postulare neque praetores diebus aliquot adiri possent vel potestatem sui facerent, in contionem ascendit et Pompeium privatum3 dictatorem appellavit.

86

136 C. PORCIUS CATO

136 C. PORCIUS CATO

F 15–18) for his activities as Tribune of the People; he was defended by M. Aemilius Scaurus (139 F 4) and acquitted (TLRR 283, 286; Cic. Att. 4.15.4, 4.16.5; on the role of C. Licinius Macer Calvus, see 165 F 30).

T 1 Fenestella (quoted by Nonius Marcellus)

= F 4.

As a Young Man on Cn. Pompeius Magnus (F 2)

with bribery and was unable to approach the praetors (CCMR, App. A: 290).

F 2 Cicero, Letters to Quintus

We have completely lost the Republic, so much so that <C.> Cato, a young man of no plan, but still a Roman citizen and a Cato, had a narrow escape with his life: when he wanted to charge Gabinius [A. Gabinius, cos. 58 BC] with bribery and for several days the praetors would not let themselves be approached or make themselves available, he [Cato] mounted the platform at a public meeting and called Pompey [Cn. Pompeius Magnus (111)] a private dictator.

87
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019