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FRL V: ORATORY, PART 3

On Campanian Land in the Senate (F1)

F 1 Cic. Q Fr. 2.1.1–2

= 128 F 4.

130 AP. CLAUDIUS PULCHER

Ap. Claudius Pulcher (cos. 54, censor 50 BC; RE Claudius 297), a brother of P. Clodius Pulcher (137), governed the province of Cilicia after his consulship and was awarded the title of imperator after defeating the Parthians. He was Cicero’s predecessor in Cilicia (and did not administer the province well); all letters in the third book of Cicero’s Ad familiares are addressed to him. Pulcher wrote a work on the augural discipline, dedicated to Cicero (T 2, 3; Cic. Fam. 3.4.1, 3.9.3; GRF, pp.426–27). In Cicero, Pulcher is described as a learned man and a well-versed orator (T 1).

Speeches at public meetings during Pulcher’s praetorship (57 BC) are mentioned (Cic. Att. 4.3.4 [CCMR, App. A: 311]; Cic. Sest. 126 [CCMR, App. A: 306]).

T 1 Cic. Brut. 267

[Cicero:] ...Appius Claudius socer tuus, conlega et familiaris meus: hic iam et satis studiosus et valde cum doctus tum etiam exercitatus orator et cum auguralis tum omnis publici iuris antiquitatisque nostrae bene peritus fuit.

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130 AP. CLAUDIUS PULCHER

On Campanian Land in the Senate (F 1)

Just after he had come into office as Tribune of the People in December 57 BC, Rutilius spoke in the Senate on issues concerning the Campanian land.

F 1 Cicero, Letters to Quintus

= 128 F 4.

130 AP. CLAUDIUS PULCHER

In 50 BC Pulcher was prosecuted by P. Cornelius Dolabella (173) for maiestas and ambitus, but was acquitted, defended by Q. Hortensius Hortalus (92 F 53–54) and M. Iunius Brutus (158 F 22) presumably on the latter charge (TLRR 344, 345; Sumner 1973, 122–23; Cic. Fam. 3.11.1–3, 3.12.1, 8.6.1; Vir. ill. 82.4). In the same year, when he was censor, Pulcher spoke on his own behalf when accused by M. Caelius Rufus (162) under the Lex Scantinia (or Scatinia) de nefanda venere (LPPR, p.293; Elster 2003, 422–24) and because of a sacellum in his house (TLRR 348, 351; Cic. Fam. 8.12.1–3; Brut. 230, 324).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] ...Appius Claudius, your father-in-law [of M. Iunius Brutus (158)], my colleague [as augur] and friend: he was rather fond of studying, an orator greatly learned and also highly experienced, and thoroughly versed in augural and also all public law, and our past history.

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019