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FRL V: ORATORY, PART 3

F 46 Prisc., GL II, pp.383.14–384.1

Asinius Pollio: “sed cum ob ea, quae speraveram dolebam, consolabar ob ea quae timui,” “consolabar” passive protulit.

F 47 Prisc., GL II, p.513.7–8

“nanciscor” etiam “nactum” facit absque n, ut Probo et Capro et Pollioni et Plinio placet.

F 48 De dub. nom., GL V, p.574.6

caminus generis masculini, sicut Pollio Asinius.

175 Q. AELIUS L.F. TUBERO

Q. Aelius Tubero (RE Aelius 156) withdrew from active advocacy and turned to the study of law (T 2) after his prosecution of Q. Ligarius (F 3–7). Tubero left writings on public and private law (T 2); he also wrote a historical work about the history of Rome (FRHist 38; on his life and the identity of the historian, see FRHist1:361–67). Dio-

T 1 Gell. NA 1.22.7

M. autem Cicero in libro, qui inscriptus est de iure civili in artem redigendo, verba haec posuit [F 1 Garbarino]: “nec vero scientia iuris maioribus suis Q. Aelius Tubero defuit, doctrina etiam superfuit.” in quo loco “superfuit” significare videtur “supra fuit et praestitit superavitque

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175 Q. AELIUS L.F. TUBERO

F 46 Priscian

Asinius Pollio: “but when I was sad because of the things that I had hoped for, I was consoled because of the things that I feared,” consolabar [“I was consoled”] he has used passively [usually deponent].

F 47 Priscian

nanciscor [“I obtain”] also creates [the participle] nactus without n [instead of nanctus], as approved by Probus and Caper and Pollio and Pliny.

F 48 Anonymous grammarian

caminus [“furnace”], of masculine gender, as Asinius Pollio [used it].

175 Q. AELIUS L.F. TUBERO

nysius of Halicarnassus dedicated his discussion of Thucydides to him, and Varro entitled one book of his Logistorici after him (Tubero de origine humana). Ancient authors describe Tubero as a very learned man, particularly in legal matters (T 1–2).

T 1 Gellius, Attic Nights

And M. Cicero, in the book that is entitled On Reducing Civil Law to a System, wrote these words [F1 Garbarino]: “Indeed Q. Aelius Tubero did not fall short of his predecessors in knowledge of the law, in learning he even outstripped them.” In this passage superfuit seems to mean “he went beyond, surpassed and outdid his predecessors

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019