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FRL V: ORATORY, PART 3

in quo ita erat: “quod eorum iudicum maior pars iudicarit id ius ratumque esto,” in tabulas absolutum non rettulit, ordinum iudicia perscripsit; postulante rursus Appio cum L. Lollio †transegisset†8 relaturum dixit. sic nunc neque absolutus neque damnatus Servilius de repetundis saucius Pilio tradetur. nam de divinatione Appius, cum calumniam iurasset, contendere ausus non est Pilioque cessit ...

F 2 Cic. Att. 6.3.10

etiam illud: orationem Q. Celeris mihi velim mittas contra M. Servilium.

170 C. SCRIBONIUS CURIO FILIUS

C. Scribonius Curio (tr. pl. 50 BC; RE Scribonius 11), the third in a series of orators of the same name and from the same family (47 + 86; cf. 47 T 4), organized magnificent games upon his father’s death (Plin. HN 36.116–20). Curio first opposed C. Iulius Caesar (121) and his associates; later, he supported him and served as Caesar’s legate in Africa (T 4–6, F 9; Luc. 4.819–20). After Curio had successfully fought against the Pompeians, he was killed in battle in 49 BC.

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170 C. SCRIBONIUS CURIO FILIUS

59 BC: LPPR, pp.389–91], in which the following could be found: “what the majority of those judges has decided, this shall be lawful and binding,” he did not put “acquitted” in the records, but wrote down the verdicts of the several classes. When Appius again applied for prosecution, he [Laterensis] said that he had settled the issue with L. Lollius [presumably a jurisconsult or one of the senior judges] and would record the facts [?]. So now Servilius, being neither acquitted nor convicted, with a reputation already damaged, will be handed over to Pilius to be tried for extortion. For Appius, although he had sworn that he was not making a false accusation, did not have the courage to contest the right to prosecute and gave way to Pilius ...

F 2 Cicero, Letters to Atticus

And one more thing: I would like you to send me Q. Celer’s speech against M. Servilius.

170 C. SCRIBONIUS CURIO FILIUS

Letters by Cicero addressed to Curio are extant (Cic. Fam. 2.1–7). Curio is a speaker, along with C. Vibius Pansa (160), in a work by his father, which is critical of Caesar’s deeds (Cic. Brut. 218).

Curio is mentioned by ancient authorities as an accomplished orator with natural ability, characterized by elaborate diction and a wealth of thoughts, and effective with the People, while it is regretted that he did not apply his faculties to different purposes (T 1–7).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019