Tools

FRL V: ORATORY, PART 3

164 P. CLODIUS

P. Clodius (not in RE), like L. Herennius Balbus (163 F1), was a supporter of the accuser L. Sempronius Atratinus (171 F 1–7) in the case against M. Caelius Rufus (162), who was defended by himself (162 F23–28), M. Licinius

Against M. Caelius Rufus (F1)

F 1 Cic. Cael. 27

nam P. Clodius, amicus meus, cum se gravissime vehementissimeque iactaret et omnia inflammatus ageret tristissimis verbis, voce maxima, tametsi probabam eius eloquentiam, tamen non pertimescebam; aliquot enim in causis eum videram frustra litigantem.

165 C. LICINIUS MACER CALVUS

C. Licinius Macer Calvus (RE Licinius 113), a son of C. Licinius Macer (110), is not recorded to have held any public offices and seems to have died at an early age (T1, 5).

Calvus was a friend of the poet Catullus (Catull. 14, 50, 96; cf. Hor. Sat. 1.10.19; Ov. Am. 3.9.62) and a Neoteric poet himself (FPL4, pp.210–18). He may also have composed a work in prose about the use of cold water (Mart. 14.196). Tacitus knew of letters by him sent to Cicero and of twenty-one published speeches (T 8–9).

310

165 C. LICINIUS MACER CALVUS

164 P. CLODIUS

Crassus Dives (102 F 12–13), and Cicero (Cic. Cael.) (TLRR 275). Cicero mentions that P. Clodius had appeared in other court cases (F 1).

Against M. Caelius Rufus (F 1)

F 1 Cicero, Pro Caelio

For as for P. Clodius, a friend of mine, although he threw himself into most impressive attitudes with the greatest energy and went through everything full of fire with the sternest language and a very loud voice, while I thought well of his eloquence, still, I did not become very scared; for in several suits I had seen him unsuccessful as a litigant.

165 C. LICINIUS MACER CALVUS

The ancients praise Calvus as a great orator; he was particularly noted for his energetic delivery, his learning, and a carefully composed and Attic style, limited only by too much self-criticism (T 1–7, 10–11, 13; cf. 158 T 7). Cicero, focusing on Calvus’ Attic style, regards his oratory as not too effective with the public (T 1–2), while Seneca, describing the passionate delivery, highlights its impact (T3). Calvus’ oratory, like that of his contemporaries, seemed old-fashioned to some in Tacitus’ time (T9).

311
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019