Tools

FRL V: ORATORY, PART 3

In March 43 BC in the Senate and to the People (F6)

F 6 Cic. Fam. 12.7.1 [ad Cassium]

quanto studio dignitatem tuam et in senatu et ad populum defenderim ex tuis te malo quam ex me cognoscere. quae mea sententia in senatu facile valuisset, nisi Pansa vehementer obstitisset. ea sententia dicta productus sum in contionem ab tribuno pl. M. Servilio. dixi de te quae potui, tanta contentione quanta meorum <laterum>1 est, tanto clamore consensuque populi ut nihil umquam simile viderim. id velim mihi ignoscas quod invita socru tua fecerim. mulier timida verebatur ne Pansae animus offenderetur. in contione quidem Pansa dixit matrem quoque tuam et fratrem illam a me sententiam noluisse dici.

161 A. HIRTIUS

A. Hirtius (cos. 43 BC; RE Hirtius 2), like his consular colleague C. Vibius Pansa (160), was a friend and pupil of Cicero (T 1–3; Cic. Fat. 2–3; Suet. Gram. et rhet. 25.3); he died in connection with the battle of Mutina in 43 BC.

270

161 A. HIRTIUS

In March 43 BC in the Senate and to the People (F6)

F 6 Cicero, Letters to Friends [to Cassius]

How zealously I have defended your [C. Cassius Longinus’, praet. 44 BC, one of Caesar’s assassins] standing both in the Senate and before the People I prefer you to learn from your domestic correspondents rather than from myself. My motion in the Senate would have gone through with ease if Pansa had not strongly opposed it. After putting forward my views, I was presented to a public meeting by the Tribune of the People M. Servilius [tr. pl. 43 BC]. I said what I could about you, to the greatest possible power of my <lungs>, amid such unanimous shouts of approval from the People that I have never seen anything like it. I hope you will forgive me for doing this against your mother-in-law’s1 wishes. Being a fearful lady, she was afraid that Pansa might be offended. In fact, Pansa said at a public meeting that your mother and brother2 too had not wished me to make that motion.

161 A. HIRTIUS

Hirtius was also a literary figure: in response to Cicero’s Cato he wrote a work in which he noted Cato’s faults. He supplied Book 8 of Caesar’s commentarii on the Gallic War. A letter by Hirtius to Cicero is extant (Cic. Att. 15.6) as are letters from Cicero to him. Hirtius is a speaker in

271
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019