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FRL V: ORATORY, PART 3

appellari oportere quasi et ipsum conditorem urbis, praevaluisset, ut Augustus potius vocaretur, non tantum novo sed etiam ampliore cognomine, quod loca quoque religiosa et in quibus augurato quid consecratur augusta dicantur, ab auctu vel ab avium gestu gustuve ...

150 T. MUNATIUS PLANCUS BURSA

T. Munatius Plancus Bursa (tr. pl. 52 BC; RE Munatius 32), a brother of L. Munatius Plancus (149), was a sympathizer of Cn. Pompeius Magnus (111); he supported P. Clodius Pulcher (137) against T. Annius Milo (138), when he was Tribune of the People in 52 BC and contributed to triggering the burning of the Senate house (Curia Hostilia) when Clodius’ body was cremated. After his term of office, Plancus was prosecuted under the Lex Pompeia de vi by

As Tribune to the People (F1–7)

When Tribune of the People in 52 BC, Plancus, along with colleagues, delivered several speeches before the People (CCMR, App. A: 333) against T. Annius Milo (138) and in vindication of P. Clodius Pulcher (137) (Asc. in Cic. Mil. 3 [p.42.9–11 C.]; in Cic. Mil. 71 [p.52.11–15 C.]; Cass.

F 1 Asc. in Cic. Mil., arg. (pp.28–29 KS = 32.24–33.5 C.)

erat domus Clodi ante paucos menses empta de M. Scauro

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150 T. MUNATIUS PLANCUS BURSA

Romulus as if he too was a founder of the city, he [Plancus] had carried the proposal that he should rather be named Augustus, not merely by a new, but also by a more honorable name, since sacred places too and those in which anything is consecrated after due observance of auguries are called “august” [augusta], from the increase [auctus] in dignity, or from the movement or feeding of birds [avium gestus gustusve] ...

150 T. MUNATIUS PLANCUS BURSA

Cicero (Cic. In T. Munatium Plancum Bursam: Crawford 1984, 230–34) and had to go into exile (TLRR 327; Cic. Fam. 7.2.2–3; Phil. 6.10, 13.27). He was recalled by C. Iulius Caesar (121) in 49 BC (Cic. Phil. 6.10, 10.22, 11.14, 13.27) and was later a legate of M. Antonius (159) in the fighting at Mutina in 43 BC. Cicero seems to suggest that Plancus had little learning (Cic. Fam. 9.10.2).

As Tribune to the People (F 1–7)

Dio 40.49.1–2). In that year Milo was charged with having killed Clodius, was found guilty despite Cicero’s defense (Cic. Mil.; cf. Cic. Sest. 86–89; Off. 2.58), and went into exile (TLRR 309).

F 1 Asconius on Cicero, Pro Milone

Clodius’ [P. Clodius Pulcher (137)] house, bought a few months earlier from M. Scaurus [M. Aemilius Scaurus

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019