Tools

FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

As Tribune Against C. Verres to the People (F3–4)

As Tribune of the People in 71 BC, Palicanus delivered a speech at a public meeting (CCMR, App. A: 240) criticizing C. Verres’ cruelness toward Roman citizens (e.g., Cic.

F 3 Cic. Verr. 2.1.122

oblitosne igitur hos putatis esse quem ad modum sit iste solitus virgis plebem Romanam concidere? quam rem etiam tribunus plebis in contione egit, cum eum quem iste virgis ceciderat in conspectum populi Romani produxit.

F 4 Cic. Verr. 2.2.100

nuntiabatur illi primis illis temporibus, id quod pater quoque ad eum pluribus verbis scripserat, agitatam rem esse in senatu; etiam in contione tribunum plebis de causa Stheni, M. Palicanum, esse questum ...

118 SER. SULPICIUS RUFUS

Ser. Sulpicius Rufus (cos. 51 BC; RE Sulpicius 95) was regarded as an accomplished orator and an outstanding jurist, who had devoted effort to training in both arts (T1–5; Quint. Inst. 12.3.9, 12.10.11). Cicero implies that Sulpicius left legal writings (T 2); according to Pomponius, there were almost 180 books (T 5).

366

118 SER. SULPICIUS RUFUS

As Tribune Against C. Verres to the People (F 3–4)

Verr. 2.5.140) and his treatment of Sthenius of Thermae (Cic. Verr. 2.2.83–99).

F 3 Cicero, Verrine Orations

Do you [the judges] think then that these men here have forgotten how that man [C. Verres] was accustomed to beat ordinary Roman folk with rods? That matter was even addressed in a public meeting by a Tribune of the People,1 when he produced before the eyes of the Roman People someone whom that man had beaten with rods.

F 4 Cicero, Verrine Orations

At the very outset news was brought to that man [C. Verres], as his father too had written to him in great detail, that the matter had been discussed in the Senate; further, that a Tribune of the People, M. Palicanus, had complained about the case of Sthenius at a public meeting ...

118 SER. SULPICIUS RUFUS

Three speeches by Sulpicius were known to Quintilian; he also mentions rather elaborate collections of notes for cases pleaded by Sulpicius (T 3–4). Two letters from Sulpicius to Cicero are extant (Cic. Fam. 4.5, 4.12).

In 43 BC Sulpicius was sent as a member of an embassy to negotiate with Marc Antony (M. Antonius [159]); en

367
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019