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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

113 C. ANTONIUS HYBRIDA

C. Antonius Hybrida (cos. 63 BC; RE Antonius 19), a son of the orator M. Antonius (65) and an uncle of the triumvir M. Antonius (159), was consul with Cicero in 63 BC, although he originally ran an election campaign with L. Sergius Catilina (112). Therefore, Cicero attacked both Antonius and Catiline in his speech In toga candida in 64 BC (Crawford 1994, 159–99); during the election campaign, Antonius voiced criticism of Cicero (F 1A–C), along with L. Sergius Catilina (112 F 2–3). After the elections, by offering Antonius Macedonia as his consular province, Cicero managed to obtain his support in fighting the Catilinarian Conspiracy; Antonius, however, did not assume an active role and let his legate M. Petreius command the army in the decisive battles in Etruria.

Against M. Tullius Cicero (F1A–C)

F 1A Asc. in Cic. Tog. cand. (pp.84 KS = 93.24–94.3 C.)

= 112 F 2.

F 1B Schol. Bob. ad Cic. Sull. 22 (p.80.13–16 Stangl)

= 112 F 3.

F 1C Quint. Inst. 9.3.93–95

nam de illo dubitari possit, an schema sit in distributis subiecta ratio, quod apud eundem primo loco positum est: [94] προσαπόδοσιν dicit, quae, ut maxime, servetur sane

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113 C. ANTONIUS HYBRIDA

113 C. ANTONIUS HYBRIDA

In 76 BC Antonius had been taken to court for extortion by some Greeks and was supported by C. Iulius Caesar (121 F24–25) when he called on the Tribunes for assistance to have his conviction overturned (TLRR 141). In 70 BC Antonius had been expelled from the Senate by the censors (121 F 24); later, he was reinstated. In 59 BC Antonius was prosecuted by M. Caelius Rufus (162 F13–18), presumably for treason and extortion (though the sources are unclear), and was unsuccessfully defended by Cicero (Cic. Pro C. Antonio collega: Crawford 1984, 124–31) (TLRR 241). Thereupon, Antonius went into exile, but he was called back by C. Iulius Caesar (121) and became censor in 42 BC.

Against M. Tullius Cicero (F 1A–C)

F 1A Asconius on Cicero, In Toga Candida

= 112 F 2.

F 1B Scholia Bobiensia to Cicero, Pro Sulla

= 112 F 3.

F 1C Quintilian, The Orator’s Education

Moreover, one could even have doubts about that, namely whether “reason assigned to each point separately,” which in his work [Rutilius Lupus 1.1, RLM, pp.3–4] is put in first place, is a figure:1 [94] he calls it “prosapodosis”; it

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019