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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

112 L. SERGIUS CATILINA

L. Sergius Catilina (praet. 68 BC; RE Sergius 23) twice stood for election to the consulship unsuccessfully; he raised the so-called Catilinarian Conspiracy in 63 BC (Sall. Cat.; Cic. Cat.) and fell fighting in Etruria in early 62 BC (on his life see, e.g., Levick 2015).

T 1 Sall. Cat. 5.4

animus audax, subdolus, varius, quoius rei lubet simulator ac dissimulator, alieni adpetens sui profusus, ardens in cupiditatibus; satis eloquentiae, sapientiae parum.

Against M. Tullius Cicero (F2–4)

F 2 Asc. in Cic. Tog. cand. (pp.84 KS = 93.24–94.3 C.)

huic orationi Ciceronis et Catilina et Antonius contumeliose responderunt,1 quod solum poterant invecti in novitatem eius. feruntur quoque orationes nomine illorum editae, non ab ipsis scriptae sed ab Ciceronis obtrectatoribus: quas nescio an satius sit ignorare.

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112 L. SERGIUS CATILINA

112 L. SERGIUS CATILINA

Sallust describes Catiline as reasonably eloquent (T 1). Catiline was prosecuted on various occasions (TLRR 212, 217, 222, 223, 379).

T 1 Sallust, The War with Catiline

His mind was reckless, cunning, adaptable, capable of any form of pretense or concealment; covetous of others’ possessions, prodigal of his own; intense in his passions; with adequate eloquence, too little soundness of judgment.

Against M. Tullius Cicero (F 2–4)

In 64 BC, before and after the elections to the consulship of 63 BC, for which they were both candidates, Catiline delivered orations against Cicero.

F 2 Asconius on Cicero, In Toga Candida

To this speech of Cicero [In toga candida] both Catiline and Antonius [C. Antonius Hybrida (113), F 1A] replied in a manner full of abuse, which was the only thing they were able to do, attacking his status as a newcomer. There are in circulation also speeches published in their name, not written by the men themselves, but by detractors of Cicero: perhaps it would be better to ignore these.

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019