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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

107A C. AELIUS PAETUS STAIENUS

C. Aelius Paetus Staienus (quaest. 77 BC; RE Aelius 98; Staienus) was originally called C. Staienus; he had himself adopted into the gens Aelia and then took the name C. Aelius Staienus Paetus (T 1; Cic. Clu. 72), though the full name does not appear in the sources (Shackleton Bailey 1991, 65).

T 1 Cic. Brut. 241, 244

[Cicero:] “...et C. Staienus, qui se ipse adoptaverat etde Staieno Aelium fecerat, fervido quodam et petulanti et furioso genere dicendi; quod quia multis gratum erat et probabatur, ascendisset ad honores, nisi in facinore manifesto deprehensus poenas legibus et iudicio dedisset. [242]...” [244] tum Atticus: “tu quidem de faece,” inquit, “hauris idque iam dudum, sed tacebam; hoc vero non putabam, te usque ad Staienos et Autronios esse venturum.”

108 C. CALPURNIUS PISO

C. Calpurnius Piso (cos. 67 BC; RE Calpurnius 63) administered the province of Gallia Narbonensis for two years after his consulship. Upon his return, he was accused in the extortion court by C. Iulius Caesar (121), in relation to unlawful punishment of a Transpadane Gaul; defended by Cicero (Cic. Pro C. Calpurnio Pisone: Crawford 1984, 77–78), Piso was acquitted (TLRR 225; Cic. Flacc. 98;

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108 C. CALPURNIUS PISO

107A C. AELIUS PAETUS STAIENUS

Staienus was active as a pleader (Cic. Clu. 74) and is mentioned as an example of someone influencing trials by corrupt practices, particularly in the court case between A. Cluentius Habitus and Statius Albius Oppianicus (Cic. Clu. 69–76; cf. 107, 114). In 76 BC Staienus took on the case concerning the property of Safinius Atella (TLRR 142; Cic. Clu. 68, 99).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] “... and C. Staienus, who had himself adopted and from a Staienus made himself into an Aelius, with a certain intense, insolent, and wild style of speaking; since that was welcomed and approved by many, he would have obtained higher honors if he had not been caught in an evident misdeed and paid the penalty exacted by the laws and the courts. [242]...” [244] Here Atticus said: “You are drawing from the dregs, and that for some time, but I have kept quiet. In fact, I did not think that you would get down to men like Staienus and Autronius [P. Autronius].”

108 C. CALPURNIUS PISO

Sall. Cat. 49.2). Earlier, Piso had been accused of misconduct in the campaign for the consulship, but the trial was abandoned owing to bribery (TLRR 190). In 63 BC Piso supported the punishment of the Catilinarian conspirators (Cic. Att. 12.21.1; Phil. 2.12; Plut. Cic. 19.1). Piso served as a judge in the trial of the actor Q. Roscius Gallus, when Cicero spoke for the defense (Cic. Q Rosc.; TLRR 166).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019