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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

F 7 Cic. De or. 3.2

= 66 F 41.

72A CN. OCTAVIUS

Cn. Octavius (cos. 87 BC; RE Octavius 20), when consul, clashed with his colleague L. Cornelius Cinna, as the latter wished to recall C. Marius and grant citizenship to tribes all over Italy. This led to a civil conflict (called bellum Octavianum by Cicero); Cinna and Marius besieged Rome, and eventually Octavius was killed.

As Consul to the People (F1)

F 1 Cic. Brut. 176

[Cicero:] Cn. autem Octavi eloquentia, quae fuerat ante consulatum ignorata, in consulatu multis contionibus est vehementer probata. sed ab eis, qui tantum in dicentium numero, non in oratorum fuerunt, iam ad oratores revertamur.

72B CN. POMPONIUS

Cn. Pomponius (tr. pl. 90 BC; RE Pomponius 3) died during the civil war in the 80s BC.

Pomponius is mentioned several times in Cicero’s Brutus: there he is described as an able, well-known orator in

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72B CN. POMPONIUS

F 7 Cicero, On the Orator

= 66 F 41.

72A CN. OCTAVIUS

Speeches to the People during Octavius’ consulship are mentioned in Cicero (CCMR, App. A: 224): these showcased his hitherto unnoticed eloquence; still, he is counted among those well able to speak, not the true orators (F1).

As Consul to the People (F 1)

F 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] And the eloquence of Cn. Octavius, which before his consulship had not been known, found high favor through many speeches to the People during his consulship. But let us return now from those who were accounted only among the competent speakers, not among the true orators, to the true orators.

72B CN. POMPONIUS

the early first century BC, who had a great effect on audiences (T 1–2; Cic. Brut. 182, 308, 311). In De oratore it is noted that his speeches suffered from a lack of organization and were therefore difficult to understand (T 3).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019