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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

105 Q. POMPEIUS BITHYNICUS

Q. Pompeius Bithynicus (b. ca. 108 BC; RE Pompeius 25) obtained his cognomen because he was instrumental in organizing Bithynia as a Roman province after the country was bequeathed to the Romans by King Nicomedes IV Philopator in 74 BC. In the civil war he sided with Cn. Pompeius Magnus (111). In 48 BC, when Bithynicus went

T 1 Cic. Brut. 240

[Cicero:] Q. Pompeius A. f., qui Bithynicus dictus est,biennio quam nos fortasse maior, summo studio di<s>cendi1 multaque doctrina, incredibili labore atque industria; quod scire possum: fuit enim mecum et cum M. Pisone cum amicitia tum studiis exercitationibusque coniunctus. huius actio non satis commendabat orationem; in hac enim satis erat copiae, in illa autem leporis parum.

T 2 Cic. Brut. 310

= 104 T 4.

106 P. SATURIUS

P. Saturius (RE Saturius 1) was a judge in the first case of A. Cluentius Habitus (against Statius Albius Oppianicus, charged with poison attempts) in 74 BC (TLRR 149; T 2; Cic. Clu. 182). In 77/76 BC he defended C. Fannius Chae-

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106 P. SATURIUS

105 Q. POMPEIUS BITHYNICUS

to Egypt after the battle of Pharsalus, he was killed (Oros. 6.15.28).

Cicero notes that Bithynicus was an ambitious, hardworking, and well-trained orator but that his delivery did not do justice to his style (T 1). Bithynicus was acquainted with Cicero (T 1–2); a letter from him to Cicero and a letter from Cicero to him survive (Cic. Fam. 6.16, 6.17).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] Q. Pompeius, Aulus’ son, who was called Bithynicus, perhaps two years older than me, had great eagerness to study, much training, and incredible application and industry. And I should know: for he was associated with me and with M. Piso [M. Pupius Piso Frugi Calpurnianus (104)] both in friendship and also through studies and exercises. His delivery did not do justice to his style; for in the latter there was sufficient fullness, but in the former there was little charm.

T 2 Cicero, Brutus

= 104 T 4.

106 P. SATURIUS

rea against Q. Roscius, the comic actor; Roscius was represented by Cicero (Cic. Q Rosc.), who commented on the opponent’s statements in his speech (TLRR 166).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019