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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

Funeral Oration for His Mother Caecilia (F1)

F 1 Nep. Att. 17.1

de pietate autem Attici quid plura commemorem? cum hoc ipsum vere gloriantem audierim in funere matris suae, quam extulit annorum XC, cum esset VII et LX, se numquam cum matre in gratiam redisse, numquam cum sorore fuisse in simultate, quam prope aequalem habebat.

104 M. PUPIUS PISO FRUGI CALPURNIANUS

M. Pupius Piso Frugi Calpurnianus (cos. 61 BC; RE Pupius 10) had a successful public career (he came from the family of the Calpurnii Pisones Frugi and was adopted by a M. Pupius). Although he lived in Cicero’s time, he was so much older that the young Cicero became attached to him as a model of a traditional way of life and learning (T 6; [Sall.] Inv. in Cic. 2). Cicero praised Piso in one of his speeches against C. Verres (Cic. Verr. 2.1.37). Yet Cicero did not approve of Piso’s behavior in relation to P. Clodius Pulcher (137); he therefore criticized the consul’s conduct in letters to Atticus (Cic. Att. 1.13.2, 1.14.6, 1.16.12). Piso was an adherent of the Peripatetics and is made to explain the views of this philosophical school in Cicero’s De fini-

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104 M. PUPIUS PISO FRUGI CALPURNIANUS

Funeral Oration for His Mother Caecilia (F 1)

Comments that Atticus is said to have made at his mother’s funeral may come from a funeral oration delivered on that occasion.

F 1 Cornelius Nepos, Atticus

And as concerns Atticus’ devotion to his family, what more should I say? Since I heard him correctly praise himself at the funeral of his mother, whom he buried at the age of ninety, when he was sixty-seven, for the fact that he had never had occasion to seek a reconciliation with his mother and had never quarreled with his sister, who was about his own age.

104 M. PUPIUS PISO FRUGI CALPURNIANUS

bus 5 (Cic. Att. 13.19.4; De or. 1.104; Nat. D. 1.16; Fin. 5.1–2).

In Cicero it is noted that, as an orator, Piso possessed some natural ability and had gone through rigorous training, that he was sharp and witty, but sometimes forced and ill-tempered, that he could not bear the labors of the Forum for long, but enjoyed success and fame as a young man and, after an interruption, again after his speech at a trial of Vestal Virgins in 73 BC (T 1; Cic. Cat. 3.9; see Bätz 2012, 243–44, with further references).

As consul in 61 BC, Piso proposed a bill concerning P. Clodius Pulcher (137) and his involvement in the Bona Dea scandal. Unusually, the consul also spoke against the

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019