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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

querentem id sibi prius perfidia deinde etiam crudelitate tua accidisse. vidi Cn. Carbonem acerrimum pueritiae tuae bonorumque patris tui defensorem, in tertio consulatu catenis, quas tu ei inici iusseras, vinctum, obtestantem se1 adversus omne fas ac nefas, cum in summo esset imperio, a te equite Romano trucidatum. vidi eodem habitu et quiritatu praetorium virum Perpernam2 saevitiam tuam exsecrantem, omnesque eos una voce indignantes, quod indemnati sub te adulescentulo carnifice occidissent.” obducta iam vetustis cicatricibus bellorum civilium vastissima vulnera municipali homini, servitutem paternam redolenti, effrenatae temeritatis, intolerabilis spiritus, impune revocare licuit. itaque eodem tempore et fortissimum erat Cn. Pompeio maledicere et tutissimum.

72 M. LIVIUS DRUSUS

M. Livius Drusus (tr. pl. 91 BC; RE Livius 18), a son of M. Livius Drusus (42), was known as an energetic Tribune of the People and a powerful orator (T 1–6; Cic. Brut. 182;

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72 M. LIVIUS DRUSUS

same distinction, lacerated with steel, complaining that this happened to him first by your treachery, then also by your cruelty. I saw Cn. Carbo,3 the most zealous defender of your boyhood and of your father’s property [cf. 70 F 12–13], bound in his third consulship by the chains that you ordered to be placed upon him, protesting that against all things lawful and unlawful he, while holding highest authority, was slaughtered by you, a Roman knight. I saw Perperna,4 an ex-praetor, in the same condition and with the same protest, cursing your savagery, and all of them with one voice indignant that without judicial sentence they perished on your orders, a mere youth as an executioner.” The huge wounds of the civil wars, already overlaid with shriveled scars, could be recalled with impunity by a man from a country town, smelling of his father’s slavery, unbridled in his impetuosity, unbearable in his arrogance. Therefore, at the same time it was both very brave and very safe to insult Pompey.

72 M. LIVIUS DRUSUS

Sen. Dial. 6.16.4); some of his measures were controversial, and he was eventually killed. Drusus was friends with the poet Archias (Cic. Arch. 6) and an acquaintance of the orator L. Licinius Crassus (66) (Cic. De or. 1.97).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019