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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

F 2 Quint. Inst. 1.1.6

... et Hortensiae Q. filiae1 oratio apud triumviros habita legitur non tantum in sexus honorem.

F 2A App. B Civ. 4.32.135–33.146

After the triumviri have proposed that the wealthiest 1,400 women should contribute to the war effort and resistance would be fined, the women protest and appoint Hortensia as their spokesperson to voice their feelings in the Forum: on behalf of the group Hortensia points out (according to Appian) that the women have already lost a number of their male relatives; if their property is taken away too, this will reduce them to a situation unbecoming to their position, especially since the women cannot be accused of

94 CN. CORNELIUS DOLABELLA

Cn. Cornelius Dolabella (cos. 81 BC; RE Cornelius 134), a supporter of L. Cornelius Sulla in the civil war, served as consul in 81 BC; afterward, he governed the province of Macedonia (80–77 BC) and celebrated a triumph upon his return (Cic. Pis. 44).

Against C. Iulius Caesar (F1)

The context of Dolabella’s critical remark about C. Iulius Caesar (121) is uncertain. It is sometimes assumed that

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94 CN. CORNELIUS DOLABELLA

F 2 Quintilian, The Orator’s Education

...and the speech of Hortensia, Quintus’ [Q. Hortensius Hortalus (92)] daughter, delivered in front of the triumviri, is read not only in honor of her sex.

F 2A Appian, Civil Wars

having done any wrongs and did not participate in politics. Hortensia recalls that their mothers have once contributed voluntarily in a war with an external enemy. At the same time, she affirms that the women will never support civil war; moreover, she notes that they have not been forced to pay in previous civil wars, only now by these men, claiming that they are reestablishing the Republic. The triumviri are angry about this political intervention by women.

94 CN. CORNELIUS DOLABELLA

Upon coming back from the province, Dolabella was charged with extortion by C. Iulius Caesar (121 F15–23), but was acquitted, defended by C. Aurelius Cotta (80 F13–14) and Q. Hortensius Hortalus (92 F 20A) (TLRR 140).

Against C. Iulius Caesar (F 1)

Dolabella spoke in his own defense when taken to court by Caesar and that the comment was made on that occasion.

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019