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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

Against Servilius the Augur and L. Cotta [?] (F2A)

F 2A Plut. Luc. 1.2; Cic. Acad. 2.1; Prov. cons. 22; Ps.-Asc. in Cic. Verr. 1.55 (p.222.15–18 Stangl)

= 90 F 4–7.

Testimony Against C. Cornelius (F2B)

F 2B Asc. in Cic. Corn., arg. (pp.53 KS = 60.19–61.5 C.); Val. Max. 8.5.4

= 92 F 31–32.

92 Q. HORTENSIUS HORTALUS

Q. Hortensius Hortalus (114–50 BC; cos. 69 BC; RE Hortensius 13) was regarded as the greatest orator before Cicero and as his only rival (T 1, 9–10). According to ancient authorities, mainly Cicero, Hortensius was a promising orator from an early age (T 1–2). He trained assiduously, but he relaxed this regime after his consulship; the lack ofexercise and the fact that the Asiatic style of speaking was seen as more appropriate for young men meant that the elder Hortensius was less highly regarded (T 2, 4–5). Hortensius’ style is described as full and elaborate, in line with the Asiatic genre, and characterized by an immaculate structure, comprehensiveness, and energetic delivery (T2–3); elsewhere, he is seen as the representative of a single type of style, the middle style (Cic. Orat. 106). He had an excellent memory (T 2; Cic. De or. 3.230; Sen. Contr. 1, praef. 19).

Hortensius’ delivered speeches were felt to be more effective than the written versions (T 7, 10); published

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92 Q. HORTENSIUS HORTALUS

Against Servilius the Augur and L. Cotta [?] (F 2A)

F 2A Plutarch; Cicero; Pseudo-Asconius

= 90 F 4–7.

Testimony Against C. Cornelius (F 2B)

F 2B Asconius; Valerius Maximus

= 92 F 31–32.

92 Q. HORTENSIUS HORTALUS

speeches were known in the time of Cicero (e.g., F51) and of Valerius Maximus (F 52). When Hortensius was handling a case together with Cicero, the latter typically gave the final speech (Cic. Brut. 190; Orat. 130).

In addition to speeches, Hortensius apparently produced playful verses (Plin. Ep.5.3.5; Ov. Tr. 2.441; Catull. 95.3; Gell. NA 19.9.7), a work on oratorical commonplaces (Quint. Inst. 2.1.11, 2.4.27), and a historical piece on the Social War (Vell. Pat. 2.16.2–3; FRHist 31 T2). Hortensius may not have been very interested in philosophy (Cic. Acad. 2.61; Fin. 1.2). Cicero’s (lost) philosophical dialogue Hortensius is named after him: it advocates the study of philosophy, while “Hortensius” supports oratory (on Hortensius in Brutus, see Garcea and Lomanto 2014).

There are only a few references to oratorical interventions by Hortensius in the Senate, indicating the circumstances, not providing details of the speeches (Cic. Att. 4.3.3; Fam. 1.1.3, 1.2.1–2; Cass. Dio 39.37.3). In 61 BC

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019