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FRL IV: ORATORY, PART 2

Unplaced Fragment (F9)

F 9 Charis., GL I, p.145.29–30 = p.184.28–29 B.

tores Servilius, ut etiam Fl. Pomponianus notat, “aurem1 tores,” pro torques.

86 C. SCRIBONIUS CURIO PATER

C. Scribonius Curio pater (cos. 76 BC; RE Scribonius 10) was the son and the father of a C. Scribonius Curio (47 + 170; cf. F 8; 47 T 4). He fought with Sulla in the Mithridatic Wars. After his consulship he administered the province of Macedonia and brought the wars there to an end, for which he was awarded a triumph (Sall. Hist. 2.80 M. = 2.66 R.; Liv. Epit. 92, 95). In 63 BC he was among the senators who demanded punishment for the Catilinarians (Cic. Att. 12.21.1). Afterward, Curio defended P. Clodius Pulcher (137); in turn, this provoked Cicero’s speech In Clodium et Curionem in the Senate in 61 BC (Crawford 1994, 233–69; for Cicero’s report on the trial, see Cic. Att. 1.16.1–6). Later, Curio was reconciled with Cicero.

T 1 Cic. Brut. 182

= 76 T 1.

122

86 C. SCRIBONIUS CURIO PATER

Unplaced Fragment (F 9)

F 9 Charisius

tores [“you twist / torture”; unusual form], Servilius, as Fl. Pomponianus [grammarian] also notes, “you torture the ear,”1 instead of torques [usual form].

86 C. SCRIBONIUS CURIO PATER

Curio wrote a dialogue including an invective against Caesar (Cic. Brut. 218; cf. FRHist A 35), and seems to have discussed geographical matters, since Pliny the Elder lists him among the sources for his Book 3 (Plin. HN 1).

In Cicero, Curio is mentioned as a respectable orator in the first half of the first century BC (T 1). It is noted that he had little education in literature, history, and law, but spoke a polished and educated Latin, such as he might have learned at home; his memory and delivery are described as ridiculous and his arrangement as disorderly, but his speeches were regarded as worth reading because of their language and style (T 2; Cic. De or. 2.98).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

= 76 T 1.

123
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019