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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

esset disertus; indicant cum oratiunculae tum historia quaedam Graeca scripta dulcissime [FRHist 3 T 1].

14 C. SULPICIUS GALUS

C. Sulpicius Galus (cos. 166 BC; RE Sulpicius 66) had a military career and was a learned and cultured man. In Cicero it is attested that he was regarded as an orator

T 1 Cic. Brut. 78

[Cicero:] de minoribus autem C. Sulpicius Galus, qui maxime omnium nobilium Graecis litteris studuit; isque et oratorum in numero est habitus et fuit reliquis rebus ornatus atque elegans. iam enim erat unctior quaedam splendidiorque consuetudo loquendi.

On an Eclipse of the Moon (F2)

Since Galus was an expert in astronomy (Cic. Sen. 49), he is said to have predicted an eclipse of the moon to the soldiers when he was fighting as a military tribune with L. Aemilius Paullus (12) in Macedonia in 168 BC (CCMR,

F 2 Liv. 44.37.5–9

castris permunitis, C. Sulpicius Gal{l}us,1 tribunus militum secundae legionis, qui praetor superiore anno fuerat,

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14 C. SULPICIUS GALUS

accounted eloquent among the first had he possessed bodily strength; some little orations show it, and especially a piece of historical narrative in Greek written with great charm [FRHist 3 T 1].

14 C. SULPICIUS GALUS

(T1). Galus acted as an advocate supporting the inhabitants of Hispania ulterior in a trial for the recovery of extorted money (Liv. 43.2.3–10).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] Now, out of the younger contemporaries [of M. Porcius Cato (8)] there was C. Sulpicius Galus, who of all the noblemen studied Greek literature most. And he was counted among the group of orators, and in other matters too he was cultured and refined. For by that time there was already a more elaborate and more brilliant habit of speaking.

On an Eclipse of the Moon (F 2)

App. B: 74; cf. Cic. Rep.1.23; Val. Max. 8.11.1; Quint. Inst. 1.10.47; Frontin. Str. 1.12.8; Zonar. 9.23). According to Pliny, Galus published on the eclipse soon afterward, though probably not the text of the speech (Plin. HN 2.53).

F 2 Livy, History of Rome

After the fortification of the camp was complete, C. Sulpicius Galus, a military tribune with the second legion, who had been praetor in the previous year [169 BC], summoned

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019