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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

a te est Popilia mater vestra laudata, cui primum mulieri hunc honorem in nostra civitate tributum puto....”

64 T. ALBUCIUS

T. Albucius (RE Albucius 2) was praetor in about 107 BC and then propraetor in Sardinia. Upon his return from the province, he was charged with extortion by C. Iulius Caesar Strabo (73 F 7–10); found guilty, he went into exile in Athens (Cic. Off. 2.50; Scaur. 40; Tusc. 5.108; Pis. 92) (TLRR 67). Albucius had accused Q. Mucius Scaevola

T 1 Cic. Brut. 131

[Cicero:] doctus etiam Graecis T. Albucius vel potius paene Graecus. loquor ut opinor; sed licet ex orationibus iudicare. fuit autem Athenis adulescens, perfectus Epicurius evaserat, minime aptum ad dicendum genus.

64A L. APPULEIUS SATURNINUS

L. Appuleius Saturninus (tr. pl. 103, 100 BC; RE Appuleius 29) was a well-known, “popular” politician (T 2), who proposed a number of laws as Tribune of the People. Eventually, Saturninus and his supporters were cornered in Rome and killed as a result of a senatus consultum ultimum in 100 BC (Cic. Brut. 224; Liv. Epit. 69; App. B

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64A L. APPULEIUS SATURNINUS

[of Q. Lutatius Catulus and of C. Iulius Caesar Strabo (73)] was eulogized by you; she was, I think, the woman to whom this honor was first rendered in our community....”

64 T. ALBUCIUS

(50) of extortion, though unsuccessfully (Cic. Brut. 102; De or. 2.281; cf. 65 F 15) (TLRR 32).

Albucius was learned in Greek matters and was a follower of Epicurus (T 1). His fondness for all things Greek was ridiculed by Q. Mucius Scaevola (50), as described by the satirist Lucilius (Cic. Fin. 1.9: Lucil. 88–94 Marx). Speeches by Albucius were extant in Cicero’s time (T 1).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] T. Albucius was actually learned in Greek matters, or rather, almost a Greek. I speak as I feel; but a judgment may be made on the basis of his orations. He was in Athens as a young man and had emerged as a complete Epicurean, a species not at all suited to public speaking.

64A L. APPULEIUS SATURNINUS

Civ. 1.32.143–45; Vir. ill. 73.9–12; on the date see MRR Suppl. 21–23).

In Cicero, Saturninus is characterized as the most eloquent of all seditious politicians after the Gracchi, while it is noted that this assessment is based more on his appearance and behavior than on his abilities as an orator (T 1).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019