Tools

FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

To the People (F5)

F 5 Cic. Rab. Post. 14

Glaucia solebat, homo impurus, sed tamen acutus, populum monere ut, cum lex aliqua recitaretur, primum versum attenderet. si esset “dictator, consul, praetor, magister equitum,” ne laboraret; sciret nihil ad se pertinere; sin esset “quicumque post hanc legem,” videret ne qua nova quaestione adligaretur.

59 M. AURELIUS SCAURUS

T 1 Cic. Brut. 135

[Cicero:] M. Aurelius Scaurus non saepe dicebat sed polite; Latine vero in primis est eleganter locutus.

In the Council of the Cimbri (F2)

Scaurus was defeated and captured by the Cimbri (Germanic tribe) in 105 BC as a legate of consul Cn. Manlius; after he had delivered a speech in their council, he was killed (Vell. Pat. 2.12.2; Tac. Germ. 37.5; Oros. 5.16.2;

358

59 M. AURELIUS SCAURUS

To the People (F 5)

F 5 Cicero, Pro Rabirio Postumo

Glaucia, an abominable man, but shrewd nevertheless, used to warn the People, when some law was being read out, to pay attention to the opening phrase. If it was “dictator, consul, praetor, master of the horse,” they should not worry; for they would know that it did not affect them; but if it was “whosoever after the passing of this law,” then they were to see to it that they were not made liable to any new form of inquiry.

59 M. AURELIUS SCAURUS

M. Aurelius Scaurus (cos. suff. 108 BC; RE Aurelius 215) is singled out in Cicero for his polished and elegant speeches (T 1).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] M. Aurelius Scaurus did not speak often, but in a polished manner; indeed, for speaking in pure Latin and elegantly he was in the first rank.

In the Council of the Cimbri (F 2)

Gran. Lic. 33.2–4 [pp.9.13–10.2 Criniti]). This “speech” is atypical since it was not delivered in Rome in one of the usual venues for public speaking.

359
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019