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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

F 8 Gell. NA 15.14.1–4

aput Q. Metellum Numidicum in libro accusationis in Valerium Messalam tertio nove dictum esse adnotavimus. [2] verba ex oratione eius haec sunt: “cum sese sciret in tantum crimen venisse atque socios ad senatum questum flentes venisse sese pecunias maximas exactos esse.” [3] “<sese>1 pecunias” inquit “<maximas>2 exactos esse” pro eo, quod est “pecunias a se esse3 maximas exactas.” [4] id nobis videbatur Graeca figura dictum; Graeci enim dicunt: εἰσεπράξατό με ἀργύριον, id significat “exegit me pecuniam.” quod si id dici potest, etiam “exactus esse aliqui pecuniam” dici potest . . .

58b C. SERVILIUS GLAUCIA

C. Servilius Glaucia (tr. pl. ca. 101, praet. 100 BC; RE Servilius 65) collaborated with L. Appuleius Saturninus (64A) on “popular” policies. For instance, he proposed a law according to which juries in trials for the recovery of extorted money would consist entirely of knights and which would introduce procedural reforms (MRR I 571–72; Lex Servilia repetundarum: LPPR, p.322). When Glaucia tried to gain the consulship for 99 BC illegally, assuming that L. Appuleius Saturninus would win a third

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58b C. SERVILIUS GLAUCIA

F 8 Gellius, Attic Nights

In Q. Metellus Numidicus, in the third book of his accusation of Valerius Messalla, we have noted something said in a novel way. [2] The words from his speech are as follows: “when he knew that he had incurred so grave an accusation and that the allies had come to the Senate in tears, to complain that they had been exacted enormous sums of money.” [3] He says “that <they> had been exacted <enormous> sums of money,” instead of “that enormous sums of money had been exacted from them.” [4] This seemed to us said with a Greek construction; for the Greeks say: εἰσεπράξατό με ἀργύριον; this means “he exacted me money.” If this can be said, it can also be said “someone to have been exacted money”1 ...

58b C. SERVILIUS GLAUCIA

Tribunate, the two men were killed by the consuls on the basis of a senatus consultum ultimum (T 1; Liv. Epit. 69).

In Cicero Glaucia’s morals and policies are condemned; it is acknowledged, however, that he was clever and an expert in provoking laughter (T 1).

Examples of witty comments by Glaucia, not necessarily coming from proper speeches, have been preserved (F3–4), as has a characteristic remark made before the People (F 5).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019