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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

Sabellio1 multam lege Aquilia †de iustitia†2 petivisset. non fecissem hominis paene infimi mentionem, nisi iudicarem qui suspiciosius aut criminosius diceret audivisse me neminem.

Against L. Sabellius? (F2A)

F 2A Cic. Brut. 131

= T 1.

58 Q. CAECILIUS METELLUS NUMIDICUS

Q. Caecilius Metellus Numidicus (cos. 109, censor 102 BC; RE Caecilius 97) acquired his cognomen (and celebrated a triumph) after waging war in Numidia and defeating Jugurtha (Sall. Iug. 43–86; Liv. Epit. 65). When the Tribune of the People L. Appuleius Saturninus (64A) proposed a land law requiring senators to swear allegiance or accept a penalty, Numidicus refused the oath and apparently was then challenged (TLRR 77; details unclear). He left Rome for exile on Rhodes and later in Tralles (in modern Turkey); he was recalled and returned to Rome in 99BC.

Numidicus studied with the Greek philosopher Car-

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58 Q. CAECILIUS METELLUS NUMIDICUS

to exact a penalty from L. Sabellius [?] under the Lex Aquilia †on justice†.1 I would not have made mention of a man almost at the very bottom if I did not feel that I never heard anyone who spoke in a manner more designed to awake suspicion or in a more accusatory fashion.

Against L. Sabellius? (F 2A)

F 2A Cicero, Brutus

= T 1.

58 Q. CAECILIUS METELLUS NUMIDICUS

neades (Cic. De or. 3.68) and was friends with the poet Archias and the scholar L. Aelius Stilo Praeconinus (74 T2; Cic. Arch. 6), who may have composed orations for him (T2–3). Numidicus was regarded as a worthy orator (T1; Cic. De or. 1.215; Vell. Pat. 2.9.1) and singled out for the purity of his Latin (Gell. NA 17.2.7). Fragments of letters writtenby him while in exile have been preserved (Gell. NA 15.13.6, 17.2.7).

Unless there is confusion in the sources, Numidicus, when censor, may have delivered a speech encouraging the People to enter marriages (18 F 6–7, with note).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019