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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

54 M. GRATIDIUS

M. Gratidius (d. 102 BC; RE Gratidius 2), a great-uncle of Cicero, served as a prefect of M. Antonius (65) in Cilicia and died in the war against the pirates there (T 1).

Gratidius proposed a bill on voting by ballot for Arpi-

T 1 Cic. Brut. 168

[Cicero:] doctus autem Graecis litteris propinquus noster, factus ad dicendum, M. Gratidius M. Antoni perfamiliaris, cuius praefectus cum esset in Cilicia est interfectus; <is> qui1 accusavit C. Fimbriam, M. Mari Gratidiani pater.2

55 C. FLAVIUS FIMBRIA

C. Flavius Fimbria (cos. 104 BC; RE Flavius 87), a homo novus (Wiseman 1971, 231, no. 180), is praised in Cicero for his diligence and strength of mind, while there are mixed reactions to his harsh, abusive, and fervid style of speaking (T 1–2; Cic. Planc. 12).

Fimbria was accused of extortion by M. Gratidius (54 T 1), with M. Aemilius Scaurus (43) appearing as a witness

T 1 Cic. Brut. 129

[Cicero:] C. Fimbria temporibus isdem fere, sed longius aetate provectus, habitus est sane, ut ita dicam, lutulen-

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55 C. FLAVIUS FIMBRIA

54 M. GRATIDIUS

num, which was opposed by Cicero’s grandfather (Cic. Leg. 3.36), and he (unsuccessfully) prosecuted C. Flavius Fimbria (55) for extortion (T 1; cf. Val. Max. 8.5.2) (TLRR 61).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] And a man educated in Greek letters and born to speak was our kinsman M. Gratidius, an intimate friend of M. Antonius [65]; when he was the latter’s prefect in Cilicia, he was killed. <He> [is the one] who brought an accusation against C. Fimbria [C. Flavius Fimbria (55)] and was the father of M. Marius Gratidianus.

55 C. FLAVIUS FIMBRIA

against the defendant, but he was not found guilty (Cic. Font. 24, 26; Val. Max. 8.5.2) (TLRR 61).

Cicero’s report indicates that Fimbria delivered speeches in the Senate and in law courts. Some of these must have been published since Cicero was able to read them when he was young; yet already at the end of Cicero’s life they were hard to find (T 1).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] C. Fimbria, at about the same time [as other orators of the late second century BC just mentioned], though more advanced in age, was certainly regarded as,

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019