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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

1 AP. CLAUDIUS CAECUS

Ap. Claudius Caecus (censor 312, cos. 307, 296 BC; RE Claudius 91) initiated a number of political reforms and building projects over the course of his career. Appius also composed poetry (FPL4, pp.11–13) and seems to have discussed issues of spelling (GRF, p.1).

Cicero implies that Appius was one of the earliest Roman speakers who deserve notice (F 6) and that a speech

T 1 Sen. Ep.114.13

multi ex alieno saeculo petunt verba, duodecim tabulas loquuntur; Gracchus illis et Crassus et Curio nimis culti et recentes sunt, ad Appium usque et Coruncanium redeunt.

T 2 Tac. Dial. 18.4

[Aper:] num dubitamus inventos qui pro Catone Appium Caecum magis mirarentur?

T 3 Tac. Dial. 21.7

[Aper:] Asinius quoque, quamquam propioribus temporibus natus sit, videtur mihi inter Menenios et Appios studuisse.

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1 AP. CLAUDIUS CAECUS

1 AP. CLAUDIUS CAECUS

of his was extant in his time, in addition to Ennius’ recreating utterances of Appius in poetic form (F4). In the later tradition, Appius is described as eloquent (Liv. 10.19.6; F8), while some regarded him as a representative of an antiquated style (T 1–3); Isidore (F9) identifies Appius as the first Roman to use prose.

T 1 Seneca, Epistles

Many [orators] seek out words from another epoch; they speak in the language of the Twelve Tables. Gracchus [C. Sempronius Gracchus (48)] and Crassus [L. Licinius Crassus (66)], and Curio [C. Scribonius Curio (47)] are too refined and modern for them; they go back right up to Appius and Coruncanius [Ti. Coruncanius, cos. 280 BC].

T 2 Tacitus, Dialogue on Oratory

[Aper:] We do not doubt, do we, that some could be found who admire Appius Caecus more than Cato [M. Porcius Cato (8)]?

T 3 Tacitus, Dialogue on Oratory

[Aper:] Asinius [C. Asinius Pollio (174)] too, though he was born in times nearer [to us], seems to me to have pursued his studies among people like Menenius [Agrippa

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019