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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

convenit credere?” qua voce ita omnium commutavit animos ut ab ipso etiam tribuno dimitteretur.

44 P. RUTILIUS RUFUS

P. Rutilius Rufus (cos. 105 BC; RE Rutilius 34) was known for his outstandingly upright character (on his life see FRHist1:278–79; on his oratory see Aubert-Baillot 2014).

Rutilius was a recognized and active legal expert, educated in Greek literature, and a follower of the Stoics and Panaetius in particular (T 1; Cic. De or. 1.226; Off. 2.47, 3.10); he was in close contact with other educated Romans, such as C. Laelius Sapiens (20) and P. Mucius Scaevola

T 1 Cic. Brut. 110–16 (cf. 43 T 1)

[Cicero:] de Scauro et Rutilio breviter licet dicere, quorum neuter summi oratoris habuit laudem, et <est> uterque1 in multis causis versatus. erat in quibusdam laudandis viris, etiam si maximi ingeni non essent, probabilis tamen industria;2 quamquam his quidem non omnino ingenium, sed oratorium ingenium defuit.... [113] ... Rutilius autem in quodam tristi et severo genere dicendi versatus est. e<ra>t3 uterque natura vehemens et acer....

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44 P. RUTILIUS RUFUS

which of the two, Romans, is it appropriate for you to believe?” With this utterance he changed the minds of all to such an extent that he was released even by the Tribune himself.

44 P. RUTILIUS RUFUS

(Cic. Off. 2.47; Amic. 101). Presumably while in exile, Rutilius wrote a historical work in Greek and a description of his life in Latin in at least five books (FRHist 21).

In Cicero, Rutilius’ speeches are described as severe, sharp, and unembellished, as was to be expected from a Stoic (T 1; Cic. Brut. 118; De or. 1.227–29). Some of Rutilius’ speeches seem to have survived until the time of the emperor Augustus (F 2).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus (cf. 43 T 1)

[Cicero:] Concerning Scaurus [M. Aemilius Scaurus (43)] and Rutilius one may speak briefly: neither of them had the reputation of being an orator of the first rank, and both <were> active in many court cases. Some men of high reputation, even though they did not have the greatest talent, still possessed commendable industry; yet these men lacked not any talent at all, but talent for oratory. ... [113] ... Rutilius, on the other hand, kept to a somber and severe style of speaking. Both men were by nature forceful

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019