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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

43 M. AEMILIUS SCAURUS PRINCEPS SENATUS

M. Aemilius Scaurus (cos. 115, censor 109 BC; RE Aemilius 140) was a respected and dominant figure in Roman political life. He was princeps senatus from about the time of his consulship until his death (T 1) and was a supporter of the optimates. He was involved in military action, embassies, building projects, the drafting of laws, and many court cases (on his life see FRHist1:267–68; Bates 1986).

In Cicero it is recorded that Scaurus’ oratory was weighty, dignified, and trustworthy, suited to appearances

T 1 Cic. Brut. 110–16 (cf. 44 T 1)

[Cicero:] de Scauro et Rutilio breviter licet dicere, quorum neuter summi oratoris habuit laudem, et <est> uterque1 in multis causis versatus. erat in quibusdam laudandis viris, etiam si maximi ingeni non essent, probabilis tamen industria;2 quamquam his quidem non omnino ingenium, sed oratorium ingenium defuit.... [111] ... in Scauri oratione, sapientis hominis et recti, gravitas summa et naturalis quaedam inerat auctoritas, non ut causam, sed ut testimonium dicere putares cum pro reo diceret. [112] hoc dicendi genus ad patrocinia mediocriter aptum videbatur,

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43 M. AEMILIUS SCAURUS PRINCEPS SENATUS

43 M. AEMILIUS SCAURUS PRINCEPS SENATUS

in the Senate (T 1–2). Some of Scaurus’ speeches were available to Cicero (T 1). Scaurus also produced an autobiography in three books (FRHist 18; cf. T 1).

Scaurus was an advocate for L. Calpurnius Bestia (cos. 111 BC) at a trial in 109 BC, when he was prosecuted by C. Memmius (60 F 5) (TLRR 54). Scaurus himself was prosecuted by Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus (69 F3–4) for failure to look after cult practices properly (TLRR 68).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus (cf. 44 T 1)

[Cicero:] Concerning Scaurus and Rutilius [P. Rutilius Rufus (44)] one may speak briefly: neither of them had the reputation of being an orator of the first rank, and both <were> active in many court cases. Some men of high reputation, even though they did not have the greatest talent, still possessed commendable industry; yet these men lacked not any talent at all, but talent for oratory.... [111] ... In the oratory of Scaurus, a wise and upright man, there was the greatest dignity and a certain innate authority, so that, when he spoke for a client, you would think not that he pleaded a case, but that he gave testimony. [112] This manner of speaking seemed suited for appearing as a patron in court merely to some extent, but

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019