Tools

FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

Against L. Opimius (F2–3)

F 2 Liv. Epit. 61.9

L. Opimius accusatus apud populum a Q. Decio trib. pl., quod indemnatos cives in carcerem coniecisset, absolutus est.

F 3 Cic. De or. 2.132

[Antonius:] ... deinde quid veniat in iudicium, quod isti sic iubent quaerere: interfecit Opimius Gracchum. quid facit causam? quod rei p(ublicae) causa, cum ex s(enatus) c(onsulto) ad arma vocasset. hoc tolle, causa non erit. at id ipsum negat contra leges licuisse Decius. veniet igitur in iudicium: licueritne ex senatus consulto servandae rei p(ublicae) causa?

37 L. CALPURNIUS PISO FRUGI

L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi (cos. 133, censor 120 [or 108] BC; RE Calpurnius 96) was probably named for his prudent and self-controlled manner (Cic. Tusc. 3.16; Sest. 21; Font. 39; on his life see FRHist1:230–33).

As Tribune of the People in 149 BC, Piso initiated the introduction of Rome’s first quaestio perpetua on the recovery of extorted money (de repetundis) (T 1; Cic. Verr.

208

37 L. CALPURNIUS PISO FRUGI

Against L. Opimius (F 2–3)

F 2 Livy, Epitome

L. Opimius, accused before the People by Q. Decius,1 a Tribune of the People, on the grounds that he had thrown uncondemned citizens into jail, was acquitted.

F 3 Cicero, On the Orator

[Antonius:] ...next, what will come before the court, which those men [teachers] order to investigate as follows: Opimius killed Gracchus. What is the issue of the case? That he did so in the interest of the country, after he had issued a call to arms on the basis of a Senate decree. Remove this [proposition], and there will be no case. Decius, however, denies that this very matter was allowed, as being against the laws. So this will come before the court: was it allowed on the basis of a Senate decree for the sake of saving the Republic?

37 L. CALPURNIUS PISO FRUGI

2.3.195, 2.4.56; Off. 2.75; Schol. Bob. ad Cic. Flacc. [p.96.28 St.]).

According to Cicero, Piso was active in the courts and supported or opposed many laws (T 1). Cicero knew speeches and a historical work by Piso Frugi (FRHist 9), even though the speeches were getting forgotten in his time; the style of Piso’s historical work is described as plain (T 1; Cic. De or. 2.53; Leg. 1.6; Gell. NA 11.14.1).

209
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019