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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

Crasso, Antonio, ceteris, item sumptis aliis a poetis et historiarum scriptoribus necesse erit eum, qui discet, putare ab omnibus omnia, ab uno pauca vix potuisse sumi.

Against Lex Aemilia (F6)

F 6 Prisc., GL II, p.474.20–22

Aemilius Porcina orator in oratione, uti lex Aemilia abrogetur: “tempore adstiturum atque petiturum me esse.”

Unplaced Fragment (F7)

F 7 De dub. nom., GL V, p.590.3

situs loci generis masculini, ut Porcina: “ille1 situs felix.”

26 L. FURIUS PHILUS

L. Furius Philus (cos. 136 BC; RE Furius 78) was known for his learning, authority, and moderation (T 2; Cic. Arch. 16; Mur. 66; Leg. agr. 2.64); he is one of the interlocutors in Cicero’s De re publica. In Cicero’s works it is noted that

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26 L. FURIUS PHILUS

Antonius [M. Antonius (65)], and others, and equally further ones have been taken from the poets and the writers of history, the learner will necessarily believe that the totality could have been taken only from them all and barely a few examples from only one.

Against Lex Aemilia (F 6)

It is uncertain against which Lex Aemilia Porcina’s attested speech is directed: perhaps the Leges Aemiliae of 115 BC on luxury or voting rights of freedmen (LPPR, pp.320–21).

F 6 Priscian

Aemilius Porcina, the orator, in the speech that the Lex Aemilia should be repealed: “that betimes I will defend and sue.”

Unplaced Fragment (F 7)

F 7 Anonymous grammarian

situs [“site”], of a place, of masculine gender, as Porcina: “that fortunate site.”

26 L. FURIUS PHILUS

Philus was regarded as a speaker of excellent and erudite Latinity (T 1).

As consul, Furius will have delivered public speeches (cf. 30 F 2).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019