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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

3 Q. FABIUS MAXIMUS VERRUCOSUS CUNCTATOR

Q. Fabius Maximus Verrucosus Cunctator (RE Fabius 116) was consul five times (233, 228, 215, 214, 209 BC), censor (230 BC), dictator twice (221, 217 BC), pontifex from 216 BC, and augur (on his life, see Plut. Fab. Max.). He received the cognomen Cunctator since he famously defeated the Carthaginians in the Second Punic War by

T 1 Cic. Brut. 57

[Cicero:] Q. etiam Maximus Verrucosus orator habitus est temporibus illis ...

Funeral Oration for His Son Quintus (F2–5)

F 2 Cic. Sen. 12

[Cato:] multa in eo viro praeclara cognovi, sed nihil admirabilius quam quomodo ille mortem fili tulit, clari viri et consularis; est in manibus laudatio, quam cum legimus, quem philosophum non contemnimus?

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3 Q. FAB. MAXIMUS VERRUCOSUS CUNCTATOR

3 Q. FABIUS MAXIMUS VERRUCOSUS CUNCTATOR

“hesitating” to start an open battle (Enn. 363–65 Sk. = 12 Ann. F 1 FRL).

In Cicero it is noted that Fabius Maximus was regarded as an orator in an early period (T 1). His speech was said to be unadorned but made weighty by its content (Plut. Fab. Max. 1.7–8).

T 1 Cicero, Brutus

[Cicero:] Q. Maximus Verrucosus, too, was accounted an orator in those times ... [6 T 1]

Funeral Oration for His Son Quintus (F 2–5)

Fabius Maximus’ funeral oration for his son Quintus (cos. 213 BC) was delivered after the son’s death in 207 BC and apparently published afterward (CCMR, App. A: 132; see Kierdorf 1980, 83–85).

F 2 Cicero, On Old Age

[Cato:] Many are the remarkable things I have observed in that great man [Fabius Maximus], but nothing more admirable than the manner in which he bore the death of his son, a noble man and a former consul. The funeral eulogy is generally available, and, when we read it, what philosopher do we not look down upon?

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019