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FRL III: ORATORY, PART 1

Unplaced Fragment (F24)

F 24 Cic. De or. 2.286

[Caesar Strabo:] saepe etiam facete concedas adversario id ipsum, quod tibi ille detrahit: ut C. Laelius cum eiquidam malo genere natus diceret indignum esse suis maioribus: “at hercule” inquit “tu tuis dignus.”

21 P. CORNELIUS SCIPIO AEMILIANUS AFRICANUS MINOR

P. Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus Africanus minor (185/84–129 BC; cos. 147, 134, censor 142 BC; RE Cornelius 335) was the second son of L. Aemilius Paullus (12) and was adopted by P. Cornelius Scipio Africani maioris filius (13). Africanus conquered Carthage (146 BC) and Numantia (132 BC); he celebrated triumphs and, after the destruction of Carthage, was awarded the same cognomen as his (adoptive) grandfather (Cic. Rep.6.11; Val. Max. 2.7.1; Vell. Pat. 1.13.2; Eutr. 4.12.2). When Africanus was found dead in his home, there were suspicions that he might have been assassinated (Cic. Q Fr. 2.3.3; Mil. 16; Fat. 18; Fam. 9.21.3; Amic. 12; Oros. 5.10.9; Plut. C. Gracch. 31(10).5; on his life see Gell. NA 3.4.1; Astin 1967).

Africanus was an educated man (T 5), a friend of C. Laelius Sapiens (20), and in close contact with the Greek philosopher Panaetius and the Greek historian Polybius (T4, 8; Cic. Acad. 2.5; Polyb. 31.23–30) as well as the Roman poets Terence and Lucilius (T 10; Cic. Fin. 1.7 = Lucil. 594 Marx). After the battle of Pydna (168 BC), in which he participated as a young man, he received books

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21 P. CORN. SCIP. AEMIL. AFRIC. MINOR

Unplaced Fragment (F 24)

F 24 Cicero, On the Orator

[Caesar Strabo:] Also, you may often humorously yield to your opponent the very point that he is making against you: for instance, C. Laelius, when some lowborn person told him that he was not worthy of his ancestors, said: “But, by Hercules, you are worthy of yours.”

21 P. CORNELIUS SCIPIO AEMILIANUS AFRICANUS MINOR

from the library of King Perseus from the spoils (Plut. Aem. 28.11). Africanus is a speaker in some of Cicero’s dialogues; in particular, he is the main figure in De re publica (for a collection of utterances attributed to Africanus, see Astin 1967, 248–69 [with the corresponding numbers indicated here]; for a selection of fragments with commentary, see Courtney 1999, 119–24).

In Cicero, Africanus is described as an outstanding orator (T 1; Cic. De or. 1.215; cf. T 9; Vell. Pat. 2.9.1), as someone whose utterances are characterized by pure Latinity (T 2; cf. Gell. NA 2.20.5) and by gravitas (T 7), and as a representative of charming language in his day (T3; cf. Quint. Inst. 12.10.10). In the Rhetorica ad Herennium Africanus is listed as one of the writers from whom examples for students could be drawn (Rhet. Her. 4.7: 25 T5). Fannius is said to have described Africanus as “ironic” in the Socratic way in his Annals (T 6; Cic. Brut. 299; Acad. 2.15; FRHist 12 F 6). Speeches by Africanus were available in Cicero’s time (T 1).

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.fragmentary_republican_latin-oratory.2019