Euetes, Testimonium and Fragment

LCL 514: 18-19

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ΕΥΕΤΗΣ

The Suda (T1) records three shadowy poets active at Athens at the same time as Epicharmus, whom he dates to“six years before the Persian Wars, ” that is in the mid-480s. As the list of tragic victors at the Dionysia (IG ii2 2325a.2) presented a . .]etes (TrGF 6) as a contemporary of Aeschy-

Testimonium

i Suda ε 2766

Ἐπίχαρμος . . . ἦν δὲ πρὸ τῶν Περσικῶν ἔτη ἕξ, διδάσκων ἐν Συρακούσαις· ἐν δὲ Ἀθήναις Εὐέτης καὶ Εὐξενίδης καὶ Μύλλος ἐπεδείκνυντο.

Fragment ΕΠΙΛΚΛΗΡΟΣ

1 Photius (z) δ 144

ἀπελθεῖν με δεῖται.

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Euetes

lus, it seemed possible that the Suda had misidentified an early tragic poet as a writer of comedy. But the fragment of Photius (citing F 1) gives not only a name but also a play Title (Heiress), which sounds far more comic than tragic. With Tsantsanoglou I suspect that this may be a hitherto unknown poet of Middle or New Comedy.

Testimonium

i Epicharmus . . . he was active six years before the Persian Wars [486/5] producing plays in Syracuse. At Athens Euetes and Euxenides and Myllus were putting on plays.

Fragment Heiress

A common title among the poets of Middle and New Comedy. An epikleros was a woman who had inherited money and property from her father, and as such could be the focus for all sorts of comedies of love and intrigue.

1 I must go away.

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.euetes-testimonium_fragment.2011