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Dio’s Roman History

Epitome of Book LXVII

1Δομιτιανὸς δὲ ἦν μὲν καὶ θρασὺς καὶ ὀργίλος, ἦν δὲ καὶ ἐπίβουλος καὶ κρυψίνους, ὥστε ἀφ᾿ ἑκατέρων τῶν μὲν τὸ προπετὲς τῶν δὲ τὸ δόλιον ἔχων, πολλὰ μὲν ὥσπερ1 σκηπτὸς ὀξέως ἐμπίπτῶν τισὶν ἐλυμαίνετο, πολλὰ δὲ καὶ ἐκ παρασκευῆς 2ἐκακούργει. θεῶν2 μὲν γὰρ τὴν Ἀθηνᾶν ἐς τὰ μάλιστα ἤγαλλε, καὶ διὰ τοῦτο καὶ τὰ Παναθήναια μεγάλως ἑώρταζε, καὶ ἐν αὐτοῖς ἀγῶνας καὶ ποιητῶν καὶ λογογράφων μονομάχων τε κατ᾿ ἔτος ὡς εἰπεῖν ἐν τῷ Ἀλβανῷ ἐποίει· τοῦτο γὰρ τὸ χωρίον ὑπὸ τὸ ὄρος τὸ Ἀλβανόν, ἀφ᾿ οὗπερ οὕτως ὠνομάσθη, ὂν ὥσπερ τινὰ 3ἀκρόπολιν ἐξείλετο· ἀνθρώπων3 δὲ ἐφίλησε μὲν ἀληθῶς οὐδένα πλὴν γυναικῶν τινων, ἐπλάττετο δὲ ἀγαπᾶν ἀεὶ ὃν ἀεὶ μάλιστα ἀποσφάξαι ἤθελεν. οὕτω γὰρ ἄπιστος καὶ πρὸς αὐτοὺς τοὺς χαριζομένους τι ἔς τε τὰ δεινότατα ὑπηρετοῦντάς οἱ4 ἐγένετο ὥσθ᾿, ὁπότε τινὲς ἢ χρήματα αὐτῷ πολλὰ πορίσειαν ἢ ἀνθρώπους πολλοὺς συκοφαντήσειαν, πάντως αὐτοὺς ἔφθειρε, καὶ μάλιστα τοὺς δούλους 4τοὺς κατὰ δεσποτῶν τι μηνύσαντας. καὶ οὕτω καὶ ἐκεῖνοι, καίπερ ἀργύριον καὶ τιμὰς καὶ

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Epitome of Book LXVII

Epitome of Book LXVII

Domitian was not only bold and quick to anger a.d. 81 but also treacherous and secretive; and so, deriving from these two characteristics impulsiveness on the one hand and craftiness on the other, he would often attack people with the sudden violence of a thunderbolt and again would often injure them as the result of careful deliberation. The god that he revered most was Minerva, in consequence of which he was wont to celebrate the Panathenaea on a magnificent scale; on these occasions he held contests of poets and orators and gladiators almost every year at his Alban Villa. This estate, situated at the foot of the Alban Mount, from which it received its name, he had set apart as a kind of acropolis. There was no human being for whom he felt any genuine affection, except a few women; but he always pretended to be fond of the person whom at the moment he most desired to slay. So faithless was he even towards those who showed him some favour or helped him in his most revolting crimes, that, whenever persons provided him with large sums of money or lodged false information against large numbers of people, he was sure to destroy them, being especially careful to do so in the case of slaves who had given information against their masters. Accordingly, such persons, though they received money and honours and

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.dio_cassius-roman_history.1914