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Dio’s Roman History

Epitome of Book LXV

LXVI 1Ταῦτα μὲν οὕτως ἔσχεν, αὐτοκράτωρ δὲ ἐπ᾿ αὐτοῖς ὁ Οὐεσπασιανὸς καὶ πρὸς τῆς βουλῆς ἀπεδείχθη, καὶ Καίσαρες ὅ τε Τίτος καὶ ὁ Δομιτιανὸς ἐπεκλήθησαν,1 τήν τε ὕπατον ἀρχὴν ὁ Οὐεσπασιανὸς καὶ ὁ Τίτος ἔλαβον, ὁ μὲν ἐν τῇ Αἰγύπτῳ ὁ 2δὲ ἐν τῇ Παλαιστίνῃ ὤν. ἐγεγόνει μὲν οὖν καὶ σημεῖα καὶ ὀνείρατα τῷ Οὐεσπασιανῷ τὴν μοναρχίαν ἐκ πολλοῦ προδηλοῦντα. βοῦς τε γὰρ ἐν τῷ ἀγρῷ ἐν ᾧ τὴν δίαιταν ὡς πλήθει ἐποιεῖτο, δειπνοῦντι προσελθὼν ὤκλασε καὶ τὴν κεφαλὴν ὑπὸ τοὺς πόδας ὑπέθηκε· καὶ κύων αὖθις, σῖτον αὐτοῦ καὶ τότε αἱρουμένου, χεῖρα ἀνθρωπίνην 3ὑπὸ τὴν τράπεζαν ὑπέβαλε. κυπάρισσός τε περιφανὴς πρόρριζος ὑπὸ σφοδροῦ2 πνεύματος ἀνατραπεῖσα, ἔπειτα τῇ ὑστεραίᾳ ὑφ᾿ ἑαυτῆς3 ἀνέστη καὶ ἀκμάζουσα διετέλεσε. καὶ παρ᾿ ὀνείρατος ἔμαθεν ὅτι, ὅταν ὁ Καῖσαρ Νέρων ὀδόντα ἀποβάλῃ, αὐταρχήσει· καὶ τοῦτό τε τὸ κατὰ τὸν ὀδόντα τῇ ἐπιούσῃ ἡμέρᾳ συνηνέχθη, καὶ αὐτὸς ὁ Νέρων ἔδοξέ ποτε ἐν τοῖς ὕπνοις τὸν τοῦ Διὸς ὄχον ἐς τὴν τοῦ Οὐεσπασιανοῦ 4οἰκίαν ἐσαγαγεῖν. ἀλλὰ ταῦτα μὲν ἑρμηνεύσεως ἔχρῃζεν, Ἰώσηπος δὲ ἀνὴρ Ἰουδαῖος ἀχθείς τε

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Epitome of Book LXV

Epitome of Book LXV

Such was the course of these events; and following a.d. 69 them Vespasian was declared emperor by the senate also, and Titus and Domitian were given the title of Caesars. The consular office was assumed by a.d. 70 Vespasian and Titus while the former was in Egypt and the latter in Palestine. Now portents and dreams had come to Vespasian pointing to the sovereignty long beforehand. Thus, as he was eating dinner on his country estate, where most of his time was spent, an ox approached him, knelt down and placed his head beneath his feet. On another occasion, when he was also eating, a dog dropped a human hand under the table. And a conspicuous cypress tree, which had been uprooted and overthrown by a violent wind,1 stood upright again on the following day by its own power and continued to flourish. From a dream he learned that when Nero Caesar should lose a tooth, he himself should be emperor. This prophecy about the tooth became a reality on the following day; and Nero himself in his dreams once thought that he had brought the car of Jupiter to Vespasian’s house. These portents needed interpretation; but not so the saying of a Jew named Josephus: he, having earlier been captured by

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.dio_cassius-roman_history.1914