Dio Cassius, Roman History

LCL 37: 332-333

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Dio’s Roman History

Fragments of Book XX

Zonaras 9, 22.

22. Φίλιππος δὲ ὁ Μακεδόνων βασιλεύς, τὸν υἱὸν Δημήτριον ἀποκτείνας καὶ τὸν ἕτερον υἱὸν τὸν Περσέα μελλήσας φονεύσειν, ἀπέθανεν. ἐπεὶ γὰρ προσφιλὴς τοῖς Ῥωμαίοις ἐκ τῆς ὁμηρείας ἐγένετο ὁ Δημήτριος, καὶ αὐτός τε καὶ οἱ λοιποὶ τῶν Μακεδόνων ἤλπιζον ὅτι μετὰ τὸν Φίλιππον τὴν βασιλείαν λήψεται, ἐφθόνησεν αὐτῷ ὁ Περσεύς, ἅτε καὶ πρεσβύτερος αὐτοῦ ὤν, καὶ διέβαλεν αὐτὸν ὡς ἐπιβουλεύοντα τῷ πατρί. καὶ ὁ μὲν φάρμακον πιεῖν ἀναγκασθεὶς ἐτελεύτησεν, ὁ δὲ Φίλιππος οὐ πολλῷ ὕστερον τὸ ἀληθὲς γνοὺς ἀμύνασθαι τὸν Περσέα ἠθέλησεν, οὐ μέντοι καὶ ἴσχυσεν, ἀλλ᾿ αὐτός τε ἀπέθανε καὶ τὴν βασιλείαν ὁ Περσεὺς διεδέξατο. καὶ οἱ Ῥωμαῖοι ταύτην τε αὐτῷ ἐβεβαίωσαν καὶ τὴν πατρῴαν φιλίαν ἀνενεώσαντο.

Ἐν δὲ τοῖς μετὰ ταῦτα χρόνοις συνηνέχθησαν μέν τινα, οὐ μέντοι καὶ ἀναγκαῖα πάνυ ὥστε καὶ συγγραφῆς νομίζεσθαι ἄξια. ὕστερον δὲ ὁ Περσεὺς πολέμιον ἑαυτὸν τοῖς Ῥωμαίοις ἐποίησεν. ἵνα δὲ ἀναβολὴν τοῦ πολέμου σχοίη μέχρις ἂν παρασκευάσηται, πρέσβεις εἰς τὴν Ῥώμην ἔπεμψεν ἀπολογησομένους τάχα περὶ ὧν ἐνεκαλεῖτο. οὓς οἱ Ῥωμαῖοι οὔτ᾿ εἴσω τοῦ τείχους

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Book XX

Fragments of Book XX

Zonaras 9, 22.

22. Philip, king of Macedonia, had put to death his son Demetrius and was about to slay his other son Perseus, when death overtook him. For because b.c. 179 Demetrius had gained the affection of the Roman people through his sojourn as hostage and hoped, along with the rest of the Macedonian people, that he should secure the kingdom after Philip’s death, Perseus, who was his elder, had become jealous of him and falsely reported him to be plotting against his father. Thus Demetrius was forced to drink poison and died. Philip not long afterward ascertained the truth, and desired to take vengeance upon Perseus; but he did not possess sufficient strength, and not only did he die himself, but Perseus succeeded to the kingdom. The Romans confirmed his claims to it and renewed the compact of friendship made with his father.

In the period following this some events took place, to be sure, yet they were not of such great importance as to seem worthy of record. Still later b.c. 172 Perseus became hostile to the Romans, and in order to delay actual warfare until he should have made his preparations, he sent envoys to Rome nominally to present his answer to the charges which were being brought against him. These messengers the Romans would not receive within the wall; and

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.dio_cassius-roman_history.1914