Dio Cassius, Roman History

LCL 37: 276-277

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Dio’s Roman History

Fragments of Book XVIII

Zonaras 9, 15.

Μέχρι γὰρ ἡ πρὸς Καρχηδονίους ἤκμαζε μάχη, κἂν μὴ φίλια σφίσι τὰ περὶ τὸν Φίλιππον ἦν, ἐθεράπευον αὐτόν, ἵνα μὴ τοῖς Καρχηδονίοις συνάροιτο ἢ ἐς τὴν Ἰταλίαν στρατεύσοιτο· ἐπεὶ δὲ τὰ κατ᾿ ἐκείνους ἠρέμησαν, οὐκέτ᾿ ἐμέλλησαν, ἀλλ᾿ ἐς πόλεμον αὐτῷ κατέστησαν φανερόν, πολλὰ ἐγκαλοῦντες αὐτῷ. πρέσβεις οὖν οἱ Ῥωμαῖοι πρὸς αὐτὸν πέμψαντες, ἐπεὶ μηδὲν ὧν ἐπετάττετο ἔπραττε, τὸν πόλεμον ἐψηφίσαντο, χρώμενοι μὲν τῇ τῶν Ἑλλήνων ἐπιβασίᾳ λαβῇ, τὸ δ᾿ ἀληθὲς ἀγανακτοῦντες ἐφ᾿ οἷς ἐδεδράκει, καὶ προκαταλαμβάνοντες αὐτόν, ἵνα μὴ καταδουλωσάμενος ἐκείνους ἐπὶ τὴν Ἰταλίαν στρατεύσῃ κατὰ τὸν Πύρρον. ψηφισάμενοι δὲ τὸν πόλεμον τά τε ἄλλα παρεσκευάσαντο εὖ καὶ στρατηγὸν ἐπὶ τοῦ ναυτικοῦ Λούκιον Ἀπούστιον Σουλπικίῳ Γάλβᾳ δεδώκασι. καὶ ὁ Γάλβας τὸν Ἰόνιον κόλπον διαβαλὼν1 ἐπὶ πολὺ ἐνόσησε. παραλαβόντες οὖν τὴν δύναμιν πᾶσαν ὅ τε ῥηθεὶς στρατηγὸς καὶ Κλαύδιος Κέντων ὁ ὑποστράτηγος, αὐτὸς μὲν τῷ ναυτικῷ τὰς Ἀθήνας ὑπὸ τῶν Μακεδόνων πολιορκουμένας ἐρρύσατο καὶ Χαλκίδα κατεχομένην ὑπ᾿ αὐτῶν ἐπόρθησε, κἀν τούτῳ Φιλίππου ταῖς Ἀθήναις ἐπιστρατεύσαντος ἐπανελθὼν τότε αὐτὸν ἀπεώσατο καὶ μετὰ τοῦτο αὖθις προσβαλόντα

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Book XVIII

Fragments of Book XVIII

Zonaras 9, 15.

As long as the struggle with the Carthaginians was at its height, they treated Philip with consideration, even though his attitude toward them was not one of friendliness; for they wished to prevent him from combining with the Carthaginians or making an expedition into Italy. But as soon as they were at peace with Carthage, they no longer hesitated, but embarked upon open warfare with him, charging him with many injuries. Accordingly, they sent envoys to him, and when he complied with none of their demands, declared war. They took as a b.c. 200 pretext his attack upon the Greeks, but their real reason was irritation at his general behaviour and a determination to forestall him, so that he should not be able to enslave Greece and make an expedition against Italy after the manner of Pyrrhus. And having declared war, they not only made thorough preparations in other respects, but also associated with Sulpicius Galba Lucius Apustius as admiral of the fleet. Now Galba after crossing the Ionian Gulf was sick for some time; and accordingly the admiral just mentioned and the lieutenant, Claudius Cento, took charge of the whole force. Cento with the aid of the fleet rescued Athens, which was being besieged by the Macedonians, and sacked Chalcis, which was occupied by the same enemy. Meanwhile Philip marched against Athens, but Cento, returning, drove him back for the time being, and also repulsed him again on the occasion of a subsequent

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.dio_cassius-roman_history.1914