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Marcus Cato

Pernas sallire sic oportet in dolio aut in seria. Cum pernas emeris, ungulas earum praecidito. Salis Romaniensis moliti in singulas semodios. In fundo dolii aut seriae sale sternito, deinde pernam ponito, 2cutis deosum spectet, sale obruito totam. Deinde alteram insuper ponito, eodem modo obruito. Caveto ne caro carnem tangat. Ita omnes obruito. Ubi iam omnes conposueris, sale insuper obrue, ne caro appareat; aequale facito. Ubi iam dies quinque in sale fuerint, eximito omnis cum suo sale. Quae tum summae fuerint, imas facito eodemque modo 3obruito et conponito. Post dies omnino XII pernas eximito et salem omnem detergeto et suspendito in vento biduum. Die tertio extergeto spongea bene, perunguito oleo, suspendito in fumo biduum. Tertio die demito, perunguito oleo et aceto conmixto, suspendito in carnario. Nec tinia nec vermes tangent.

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On Agriculture

ofella.1 You should salt hams in the following manner, in a jar or large pot: When you have bought the hams cut off the hocks. Allow a half-modius of ground Roman salt to each ham. Spread salt on the bottom of the jar or pot; then lay a ham, with the skin facing downwards, and cover the whole with salt. Place another ham over it and cover in the same way, taking care that meat does not touch meat. Continue in the same way until all are covered. When you have arranged them all, spread salt above so that the meat shall not show, and level the whole. When they have remained five days in the salt remove them all with their own salt. Place at the bottom those which had been on top before, covering and arranging them as before. Twelve days later take them out finally, brush off all the salt, and hang them for two days in a draught. On the third day clean them thoroughly with a sponge and rub with oil. Hang them in smoke for two days, and the third day take them down, rub with a mixture of oil and vinegar, and hang in the meat-house. No moths or worms will touch them.

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DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.cato-agriculture.1934