Aristophanes, Acharnians

LCL 178: 108-109

Tools

Aristophanes

ΔΙΚΑΙΟΠΟΛΙΣ

ἀλλ᾿ ἐκκυκλήθητ᾿.

ΕΥΡΙΠΙΔΗΣ

ἀλλ᾿ ἀδύνατον.

ΔΙΚΑΙΟΠΟΛΙΣ

ἀλλ᾿ ὅμως.

ΕΥΡΙΠΙΛΗΣ

ἀλλλ᾿ ἐκκυκλήσομαι· καταβαίνειν δ᾿ οὐ σχολή.

ΔΙΚΑΙΟΠΟΛΙΣ

Εὐριπίδη.

ΕΥΡΙΠΙΔΗΣ

τί λέλακας;

ΔΙΚΑΙΟΠΟΛΙΣ

410ἀναβάδην ποιεῖς, ἐξὸν καταβάδην; οὐκ ἐτὸς χωλοὺς ποιεῖς. ἀτὰρ τί τὰ ῥάκι᾿ ἐκ τραγῳδίας ἔχεις, ἐσθῆτ᾿ ἐλεινήν; οὐκ ἐτὸς πτωχοὺς ποιεῖς. ἀλλ᾿ ἀντιβολῶ πρὸς τῶν γονάτων σ᾿, Εὐριπίδη, 415δός μοι ῥάκιόν τι τοῦ παλαιοῦ δράματος. δεῖ γάρ με λέξαι τῷ χορῷ ῥῆσιν μακράν· αὕτη δὲ θάνατον, ἢν κακῶς λέξω, φέρει.

ΕΥΡΙΠΙΔΗΣ

τὰ ποῖα τρύχη; μῶν ἐν οἷς Οἰνεὺς ὁδὶ

108

Acharnians

Dicaeopolis

Then have yourself wheeled out. 54

Euripides

Quite impossible.

Dicaeopolis

Do it anyway.

Euripides

All right, I’ll have myself wheeled out; I’ve no time to get up.

euripides is revealed reclining on a couch.
Dicaeopolis

Euripides?

Euripides

Why this utterance?

Dicaeopolis

Do you compose with your feet up, when they could be down? No wonder you create cripples! And why do you wear those rags from tragedy, a raiment piteous? No wonder you create beggars! But come, I beg you by your knees, Euripides, give me a bit of rag from that old play. I’ve got to make a long speech to the chorus, and if I speak poorly, it means my death.

Euripides

Which ragged garb? (rummaging through his costumes)

109
DOI: 10.4159/DLCL.aristophanes-acharnians.1998