Fragmentary Republican Latin, Volume III: Oratory, Part 1

LCL 540:

The Loeb Classical Library series Fragmentary Republican Latin continues with oratory, an important element of Roman life from the earliest times, essential to running public affairs and for advancing individual careers long before it acquired literary dimensions, which happened once orators decided to write up and circulate written versions of their speeches after delivery.

Beginning with Appius Claudius Caecus (340–273 BC), this three-volume edition covers the full range of speech-making—political, juridical, and epideictic (display)—and with the exceptions of Cato the Elder and Cicero includes all individuals for whom speech-making is attested and for whose speeches quotations, descriptive testimonia, or historiographic recreations survive.

Such an overview provides insight into the typical forms and themes of Roman oratory as well as its wide variety of occasions and styles. By including orators from different phases within the Republican period as well as men given high or low rankings by contemporaries and later ancient critics, the collection offers a fuller panorama of Roman Republican oratory than a selection guided simply by an orator’s alleged or canonical quality, or by the amount of evidence available.

This edition includes all the orators recognized by Malcovati and follows her numbering, but the texts have been drawn from the most recent and reliable editions of the source authors and revised in light of current scholarship; additional material has been included with its own separate numbering. Faithful translations, informative introductions, and ample annotation guide readers.

Table of Contents

Bibiliographic reference

Fragmentary Republican Latin, Volume III: Oratory, Part 1. Edited and translated by Gesine Manuwald. Loeb Classical Library 540. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019.